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Author Borniger, J.C.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Photoperiodic Regulation of Behavior: Peromyscus as a Model System Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology Abbreviated Journal Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology  
  Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages (down) 946-948  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Winter and summer present vastly different challenges to animals living outside of the tropics. To survive and reproduce, individuals must anticipate seasonal environmental changes and adjust physiology and behavior accordingly. Photoperiod (day length) offers a relatively ‘noise free’ environmental signal that non-tropical animals use to tell the time of year, and whether winter is approaching or receding. In some cases, photoperiodic signals may be fine-tuned by other proximate cues such as food availability or temperature. The pineal hormone, melatonin, is a primary physiological transducer of the photoperiodic signal. It tracks night length and provokes changes in physiology and behavior at appropriate times of the year. Because of their wide latitudinal distribution, Peromyscus has been well studied in the context of photoperiodic regulation of physiology and behavior. Here, we discuss how photoperiodic signals are transduced by pineal melatonin, how melatonin acts on target tissues, and subsequent consequences for behavior. Using a life-history paradigm involving trade-offs between the immune and reproductive systems, specific emphasis is placed on aggression, metabolism, and cognition. We discuss future directions including examining the effects of light pollution on photoperiodism, genetic manipulations to test the role of specific genes in the photoperiodic response, and using Peromyscus to test evolutionary theories of aging.  
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  ISSN 1084-9521 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1469  
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Author Kyba, C.C.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Defense Meteorological Satellite Program data should no longer be used for epidemiological studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiology International  
  Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages (down) 943-945  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health; Remote Sensing  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1459  
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Author Alabia, I.; Dehara, M.; Saitoh, S.-I.; Hirawake, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Seasonal Habitat Patterns of Japanese Common Squid (Todarodes Pacificus) Inferred from Satellite-Based Species Distribution Models Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 8 Issue 11 Pages (down) 921  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Animals  
  Abstract The understanding of the spatio-temporal distributions of the species habitat in the marine environment is central to effectual resource management and conservation. Here, we examined the potential habitat distributions of Japanese common squid (Todarodes pacificus) in the Sea of Japan during a four-year period. The seasonal patterns of preferential habitat were inferred from species distribution models, built using squid occurrences detected from night-time visible images and remotely-sensed environmental factors. The predicted squid habitat (i.e., areas with high habitat suitability) revealed strong seasonal variability, characterized by a reduction of potential habitat, confined off of the southern part of the basin during the winter–spring period (December–May). Apparent expansion of preferential habitat occurred during summer–autumn months (June–November), concurrent with the formation of highly suitable habitat patches in certain regions of the Sea of Japan. These habitat distribution patterns were in response to changes in oceanographic conditions and synchronous with seasonal migration of squid. Moreover, the most important variables regulating the spatio-temporal patterns of suitable habitat were sea surface temperature, depth, sea surface height anomaly, and eddy kinetic energy. These variables could affect the habitat distributions through their impacts on growth and survival of squid, local nutrient transport, and the availability of favorable spawning and feeding grounds.  
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  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1551  
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Author Raap, T.; Casasole, G.; Pinxten, R.; Eens, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Early life exposure to artificial light at night affects the physiological condition: An experimental study on the ecophysiology of free-living nestling songbirds Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut  
  Volume 218 Issue Pages (down) 909-914  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light pollution or artificial light at night (ALAN) is increasingly recognised to be an important anthropogenic environmental pressure on wildlife, affecting animal behaviour and physiology. Early life experiences are extremely important for the development, physiological status and health of organisms, and as such, early exposure to artificial light may have detrimental consequences for organism fitness. We experimentally manipulated the light environment of free-living great tit nestlings (Parus major), an important model species in evolutionary and environmental research. Haptoglobin (Hp) and nitric oxide (NOx), as important indicators of immunity, health, and physiological condition, were quantified in nestlings at baseline (13 days after hatching) and after a two night exposure to ALAN. We found that ALAN increased Hp and decreased NOx. ALAN may increase stress and oxidative stress and reduce melatonin which could subsequently lead to increased Hp and decreased NOx. Haptoglobin is part of the immune response and mounting an immune response is costly in energy and resources and, trade-offs are likely to occur with other energetically demanding tasks, such as survival or reproduction. Acute inhibition of NOx may have a cascading effect as it also affects other physiological aspects and may negatively affect immunocompetence. The consequences of the observed effects on Hp and NOx remain to be examined. Our study provides experimental field evidence that ALAN affects nestlings' physiology during development and early life exposure to ALAN could therefore have long lasting effects throughout adulthood.  
  Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology and Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:27531621 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1514  
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Author Sandwell, R.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The emergence of modern lighting in Canada: A preliminary reconnaissance Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Extractive Industries and Society Abbreviated Journal The Extractive Industries and Society  
  Volume 3 Issue 3 Pages (down) 850-863  
  Keywords History  
  Abstract Recent work in the international field of energy history emphasizes the diversity that defines industrialization around the world, and even within different energy sectors of the same country. Energy history is a newly emerging field in Canada, and one where recent preliminary research now makes it possible to venture into the area of comparative energy studies. This paper provides a preliminary reconnaissance of the emergence of modern lighting in Canada, situating its history within the country’s larger idiosyncratic transition from the organic to the mineral energy regime. Canadians have always been among the world's highest energy consumers per capita, and they made a relatively late transition to the industrial regime. The country’s cold environment, its dispersed settlement patterns, the persistence of a distinct rural political economy supported by an abundance of energy from the organic regime, as well as the absence of cheap coal in Central Canada, help to explain the country’s distinctive characteristics. The history of lighting, however, is an exception within Canadian energy history: locally available, petroleum-based illuminating oil and stateowned hydroelectricity were adopted relatively early, comprising an exception within Canada’s late-modernizing trend: lighting, and not heat or power, led the country’s transition to the modern energy regime.  
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  ISSN 2214790X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1503  
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