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Author Wambrauw, D.Z.K.; Kashiwatani, T.; Komura, A.; Hasegawa, H.; Narita, K.; Oku, S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Honda, K.; Maeda, omoo url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of Supplemental Light on the Quality of Green Asparagus Spears in Winter ‘Fusekomi’ Forcing Culture Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Environment Control in Biology Abbreviated Journal Environmental Control in Biology  
  Volume 54 Issue 3 Pages (up) 147-152  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Winter ‘fusekomi’ forcing culture of asparagus is becoming popular in Japan because the method can make production of asparagus possible during cold season. However, there are some problems such as color of the spear is pale, and rutin content is lower compared to spring harvest due to the low light intensity, especially in the production area which has much snow and short sunshine. The objective of this study was to clarify the effect of supplemental lighting on the yield, rutin content, sugar component (fructose, glucose, sucrose), and the color of spears. The experiments were conducted by using different irradiation time and different numbers of fluorescent lamps hanging on the tunnel poles over the cultivation bed on the winter ‘fusekomi’ forcing culture. Compared to the control, rutin content was significantly increased under supplemental lighting plots. No significant difference or negative impact was observed in sugar contents and yield on each plot. Moreover, spear color also appeared to be better under supplemental lighting than that of the control. These results suggested that supplemental lighting was effective to improve the quality of asparagus spears (such as rutin contents, spears color), especially for the production area that has low light intensity or in short day conditions.  
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  ISSN 1880-554X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1493  
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Author Da Silva, A.; Valcu, M.; Kempenaers, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Behavioural plasticity in the onset of dawn song under intermittent experimental night lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour  
  Volume 117 Issue Pages (up) 155-165  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The disruption of daily rhythms is one of the most studied ecological consequences of light pollution. Previous work showed that several songbird species initiated dawn song earlier in areas with light pollution. However, the mechanisms underlying this shift are still unknown. Individuals may immediately adjust their timing of singing to the presence of artificial light (behavioural plasticity), but the observed effect may also be due to phenotype-dependent habitat choice, effects of conditions during early life or micro-evolution. The main aim of this study was to experimentally investigate how males of four common passerine species respond to day-to-day variation in the presence of artificial night lighting in terms of the timing of singing. During two consecutive breeding seasons, we manipulated the presence of light throughout the night in a cyclic fashion in several naturally undisturbed forest patches. We show that individuals of all four species immediately and reversibly adjusted their onset of dawn singing in response to artificial light. The effect was strongest in the European robin, but relatively small in the blue tit, the great tit and the blackbird. The effect in the latter two species was smaller than expected from the correlational studies. This may be coincidence (small sample size of this study), but it could also indicate that there are longer-term effects of living in light-polluted urban areas on timing of dawn singing, or that birds use compensatory behaviours such as light avoidance. We found no evidence that our light treatment had carryover effects into the subsequent dark period, but robins progressively advanced their dawn singing during the light treatment.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1467  
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Author Cozzolino, E.; Lasta, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Use of VIIRS DNB satellite images to detect jigger ships involved in the Illex argentinus fishery Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment  
  Volume 4 Issue Pages (up) 167-178  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The distribution of Illex argentinus squid extends from 23°S to 54°S. The largest catches of the species, which represents one of the most important fisheries in Argentina, take place between 35°S and 52°S. Argentina's fisheries administration keeps close records of the Argentine fleet position and the Cephalopod laboratory at the Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Desarrollo Pesquero (INIDEP) monitors and suggests actions for the management of the resource. The catches are carried out both within national and adjacent international waters. Fleets from different countries participate in the fisheries operating jigger vessels during the night with strong lights to attract the squid. One of the greatest difficulties in the evaluation of the status of this resource is to know the number of foreign vessels fishing outside the Argentine Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer (VIIRS) day/night band (DNB) satellite images are a useful tool to monitor and quantify these fleets, building on the capacity of the sensors to detect the light emitted by the lamps placed on the ship decks. In this work, we report the development of a specific new method (set of algorithms) to process the images and identify automatically the jigger ships that compose the overseas fleet. Results were validated using the positioning data of the Argentine jigger fleet and comparing light emissions of these vessels against those identified by the new method. The process of identifying ships has proved to be robust considering the statistical results obtained: mean relative error (MRE) of 0.03% and a root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 1.62 ships.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2352-9385 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1536  
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Author Travis, R.C.; Balkwill, A.; Fensom, G.K.; Appleby, P.N.; Reeves, G.K.; Wang, X.-S.; Roddam, A.W.; Gathani, T.; Peto, R.; Green, J.; Key, T.J.; Beral, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night Shift Work and Breast Cancer Incidence: Three Prospective Studies and Meta-analysis of Published Studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of the National Cancer Institute Abbreviated Journal JNCI J Natl Cancer Inst  
  Volume 108 Issue 12 Pages (up) djw169  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Background: It has been proposed that night shift work could increase breast cancer incidence. A 2007 World Health Organization review concluded, mainly from animal evidence, that shift work involving circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans. We therefore aimed to generate prospective epidemiological evidence on night shift work and breast cancer incidence.

Methods: Overall, 522 246 Million Women Study, 22 559 EPIC-Oxford, and 251 045 UK Biobank participants answered questions on shift work and were followed for incident cancer. Cox regression yielded multivariable-adjusted breast cancer incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for night shift work vs no night shift work, and likelihood ratio tests for interaction were used to assess heterogeneity. Our meta-analyses combined these and relative risks from the seven previously published prospective studies (1.4 million women in total), using inverse-variance weighted averages of the study-specific log RRs.

Results: In the Million Women Study, EPIC-Oxford, and UK Biobank, respectively, 673, 28, and 67 women who reported night shift work developed breast cancer, and the RRs for any vs no night shift work were 1.00 (95% CI = 0.92 to 1.08), 1.07 (95% CI = 0.71 to 1.62), and 0.78 (95% CI = 0.61 to 1.00). In the Million Women Study, the RR for 20 or more years of night shift work was 1.00 (95% CI = 0.81 to 1.23), with no statistically significant heterogeneity by sleep patterns or breast cancer risk factors. Our meta-analysis of all 10 prospective studies included 4660 breast cancers in women reporting night shift work; compared with other women, the combined relative risks were 0.99 (95% CI = 0.95 to 1.03) for any night shift work, 1.01 (95% CI = 0.93 to 1.10) for 20 or more years of night shift work, and 1.00 (95% CI = 0.87 to 1.14) for 30 or more years.

Conclusions: The totality of the prospective evidence shows that night shift work, including long-term shift work, has little or no effect on breast cancer incidence.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8874 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1540  
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Author Buijs, F.N.; Leon-Mercado, L.; Guzman-Ruiz, M.; Guerrero-Vargas, N.N.; Romo-Nava, F.; Buijs, R.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Circadian System: A Regulatory Feedback Network of Periphery and Brain Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Physiology (Bethesda, Md.) Abbreviated Journal Physiology (Bethesda)  
  Volume 31 Issue 3 Pages (up) 170-181  
  Keywords Human health; circadian rhythm; suprachiasmatic nucleus; brain; clock genes; SCN; review; circadian desynchronization; shiftwork  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms are generated by the autonomous circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and clock genes that are present in all tissues. The SCN times these peripheral clocks, as well as behavioral and physiological processes. Recent studies show that frequent violations of conditions set by our biological clock, such as shift work, jet lag, sleep deprivation, or simply eating at the wrong time of the day, may have deleterious effects on health. This infringement, also known as circadian desynchronization, is associated with chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, cancer, and psychiatric disorders. In this review, we will evaluate evidence that these diseases stem from the need of the SCN for peripheral feedback to fine-tune its output and adjust physiological processes to the requirements of the moment. This feedback can vary from neuronal or hormonal signals from the liver to changes in blood pressure. Desynchronization renders the circadian network dysfunctional, resulting in a breakdown of many functions driven by the SCN, disrupting core clock rhythms in the periphery and disorganizing cellular processes that are normally driven by the synchrony between behavior and peripheral signals with neuronal and humoral output of the hypothalamus. Consequently, we propose that the loss of synchrony between the different elements of this circadian network as may occur during shiftwork and jet lag is the reason for the occurrence of health problems.  
  Address Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico; ruudbuijs(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher American Physiological Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1548-9221 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27053731 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1429  
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