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Author Lin, C.-F.; Tsai, T.-Y.; Chen, K.-Y.; Shen, P.-C.
Title Efficient warm-white lighting using rare-earth-element-free fluorescent materials for saving energy, environment protection and human health Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication RSC Adv. Abbreviated Journal RSC Adv.
Volume 6 Issue 113 Pages 111959-111965
Keywords Lighting
Abstract Solid-state white light emission is important for energy saving, but currently it is mainly based on environmentally unfriendly rare-earth doped phosphors or cadmium-containing quantum dots. Here, we explore an environmentally friendly approach for efficient white light emission based on ZnSe:Mn nanoparticles without rare-earth or cadmium elements. The emission is composed of a broad green-orange spectral band (525–650 nm) with the peak located at 578 nm and the color temperature is low, so it is particularly good for lighting at night to reduce risks to human health. Furthermore, the optimal absorption peak could be designed at 453 nm, which well matches the commercial blue-LED emission wavelength (445–470 nm). A quantum yield up to 84.5% could also be achieved. This rare-earth-element-free material opens up a new avenue for energy-saving, healthy, and environmentally benign lighting.
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ISSN (down) 2046-2069 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1566
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Author Straka, T.M.; Lentini, P.E.; Lumsden, L.F.; Wintle, B.A.; van der Ree, R.
Title Urban bat communities are affected by wetland size, quality, and pollution levels Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol
Volume 6 Issue 14 Pages 4761-4774
Keywords Ecology, Animals
Abstract Wetlands support unique biota and provide important ecosystem services. These services are highly threatened due to the rate of loss and relative rarity of wetlands in most landscapes, an issue that is exacerbated in highly modified urban environments. Despite this, critical ecological knowledge is currently lacking for many wetland-dependent taxa, such as insectivorous bats, which can persist in urban areas if their habitats are managed appropriately. Here, we use a novel paired landscape approach to investigate the role of wetlands in urban bat conservation and examine local and landscape factors driving bat species richness and activity. We acoustically monitored bat activity at 58 urban wetlands and 35 nonwetland sites (ecologically similar sites without free-standing water) in the greater Melbourne area, southeastern Australia. We analyzed bat species richness and activity patterns using generalized linear mixed-effects models. We found that the presence of water in urban Melbourne was an important driver of bat species richness and activity at a landscape scale. Increasing distance to bushland and increasing levels of heavy metal pollution within the waterbody also negatively influenced bat richness and individual species activity. Areas with high levels of artificial night light had reduced bat species richness, and reduced activity for all species except those adapted to urban areas, such as the White-striped free-tailed bat (Austronomus australis). Increased surrounding tree cover and wetland size had a positive effect on bat species richness. Our findings indicate that wetlands form critical habitats for insectivorous bats in urban environments. Large, unlit, and unpolluted wetlands flanked by high tree cover in close proximity to bushland contribute most to the richness of the bat community. Our findings clarify the role of wetlands for insectivorous bats in urban areas and will also allow for the preservation, construction, and management of wetlands that maximize conservation outcomes for urban bats and possibly other wetland-dependent and nocturnal fauna.
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ISSN (down) 2045-7758 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1499
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Author Wakefield, A.; Broyles, M.; Stone, E.L.; Jones, G.; Harris, S.
Title Experimentally comparing the attractiveness of domestic lights to insects: Do LEDs attract fewer insects than conventional light types? Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol
Volume 6 Issue 22 Pages 8028-8036
Keywords ecology; Lighting
Abstract LED lighting is predicted to constitute 70% of the outdoor and residential lighting markets by 2020. While the use of LEDs promotes energy and cost savings relative to traditional lighting technologies, little is known about the effects these broad-spectrum “white” lights will have on wildlife, human health, animal welfare, and disease transmission. We conducted field experiments to compare the relative attractiveness of four commercially available “domestic” lights, one traditional (tungsten filament) and three modern (compact fluorescent, “cool-white” LED and “warm-white” LED), to aerial insects, particularly Diptera. We found that LEDs attracted significantly fewer insects than other light sources, but found no significant difference in attraction between the “cool-” and “warm-white” LEDs. Fewer flies were attracted to LEDs than alternate light sources, including fewer Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Use of LEDs has the potential to mitigate disturbances to wildlife and occurrences of insect-borne diseases relative to competing lighting technologies. However, we discuss the risks associated with broad-spectrum lighting and net increases in lighting resulting from reduced costs of LED technology.
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ISSN (down) 2045-7758 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1541
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Author Yang, Y.-F.; Jiang, J.-S.; Pan, J.-M.; Ying, Y.-B.; Wang, X.-S.; Zhang, M.-L.; Lu, M.-S.; Chen, X.-H.
Title The relationship of spectral sensitivity with growth and reproductive response in avian breeders (Gallus gallus) Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 6 Issue Pages 19291
Keywords Animals; birds; Gallus gallus; spectrum; *Reproduction; photobiology; biology
Abstract A previous study demonstrated that birds that are exposed to light at night develop advanced reproductive systems. However, spectrum might also affect the photoperiodic response of birds. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of spectral composition on the growth and reproductive physiology of female breeders, using pure light-emitting diode spectra. A total of 1,000 newly hatched female avian breeders (Gallus gallus) were equally allocated to white-, red-, yellow-, green- and blue-light treated groups. We found that blue-light treated birds had a greater and faster weight gain than did red- and yellow-light treated birds (P = 0.02 and 0.05). The red light expedited the sexual maturation of the chicks, whose age at sexual maturity was 7 and 14 days earlier than that of the green- and blue-light treated birds, respectively. The accumulative egg production of the red-light treated birds was 9 and 8 eggs more than that of the blue- and green-light treated birds. The peak lay rate of the red-light treated groups was significantly greater than the blue-light treated birds (P = 0.028). In conclusion, exposure to short-wavelength light appears to promote growth of female breeder birds, whereas exposure to long-wavelength light appears to accelerate reproductive performance.
Address Zhejiang Guangda Breeding Poultry Corporation, Jiaxing 314423, China
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26765747 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1338
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Author Kaneshi, Y.; Ohta, H.; Morioka, K.; Hayasaka, I.; Uzuki, Y.; Akimoto, T.; Moriichi, A.; Nakagawa, M.; Oishi, Y.; Wakamatsu, H.; Honma, N.; Suma, H.; Sakashita, R.; Tsujimura, S.-I.; Higuchi, S.; Shimokawara, M.; Cho, K.; Minakami, H.
Title Influence of light exposure at nighttime on sleep development and body growth of preterm infants Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 6 Issue Pages 21680
Keywords Health
Abstract Previous studies have demonstrated that a light-dark cycle has promoted better sleep development and weight gain in preterm infants than constant light or constant darkness. However, it was unknown whether brief light exposure at night for medical treatment and nursing care would compromise the benefits brought about by such a light-dark cycle. To examine such possibility, we developed a special red LED light with a wavelength of >675 nm which preterm infants cannot perceive. Preterm infants born at <36 weeks' gestational age were randomly assigned for periodic exposure to either white or red LED light at night in a light-dark cycle after transfer from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to the Growing Care Unit, used for supporting infants as they mature. Activity, nighttime crying and body weight were continuously monitored from enrolment until discharge. No significant difference in rest-activity patterns, nighttime crying, or weight gain was observed between control and experimental groups. The data indicate that nursing care conducted at 3 to 4-hour intervals exposing infants to light for <15 minutes does not prevent the infants from developing circadian rest-activity patterns, or proper body growth as long as the infants are exposed to regular light-dark cycles.
Address Department of Obstetrics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, N15, W7, Kitaku, Sapporo 060-8638, Japan
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (down) 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26877166 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1358
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