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Author Pilorz, V.; Tam, S.K.E.; Hughes, S.; Pothecary, C.A.; Jagannath, A.; Hankins, M.W.; Bannerman, D.M.; Lightman, S.L.; Vyazovskiy, V.V.; Nolan, P.M.; Foster, R.G.; Peirson, S.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melanopsin Regulates Both Sleep-Promoting and Arousal-Promoting Responses to Light Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PLoS Biology Abbreviated Journal PLoS Biol  
  Volume 14 Issue 6 Pages e1002482  
  Keywords Human health; melanopsin; sleep; circadian rhythm  
  Abstract Light plays a critical role in the regulation of numerous aspects of physiology and behaviour, including the entrainment of circadian rhythms and the regulation of sleep. These responses involve melanopsin (OPN4)-expressing photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs) in addition to rods and cones. Nocturnal light exposure in rodents has been shown to result in rapid sleep induction, in which melanopsin plays a key role. However, studies have also shown that light exposure can result in elevated corticosterone, a response that is not compatible with sleep. To investigate these contradictory findings and to dissect the relative contribution of pRGCs and rods/cones, we assessed the effects of light of different wavelengths on behaviourally defined sleep. Here, we show that blue light (470 nm) causes behavioural arousal, elevating corticosterone and delaying sleep onset. By contrast, green light (530 nm) produces rapid sleep induction. Compared to wildtype mice, these responses are altered in melanopsin-deficient mice (Opn4-/-), resulting in enhanced sleep in response to blue light but delayed sleep induction in response to green or white light. We go on to show that blue light evokes higher Fos induction in the SCN compared to the sleep-promoting ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO), whereas green light produced greater responses in the VLPO. Collectively, our data demonstrates that nocturnal light exposure can have either an arousal- or sleep-promoting effect, and that these responses are melanopsin-mediated via different neural pathways with different spectral sensitivities. These findings raise important questions relating to how artificial light may alter behaviour in both the work and domestic setting.  
  Address Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute (SCNi), Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Oxford Molecular Pathology Institute, Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; stuart.peirson(at)eye.ox.ac.uk (SNP); russell.foster(at)eye.ox.ac.uk (RGF).  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher PLOS Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 1544-9173 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27276063; PMCID:PMC4898879 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1490  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Keshet-Sitton, A.; Or-Chen, K.; Yitzhak, S.; Tzabary, I.; Haim, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light and the City: Breast Cancer Risk Factors Differ Between Urban and Rural Women in Israel Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Integrative Cancer Therapies Abbreviated Journal Integr Cancer Ther  
  Volume 16 Issue 2 Pages 176-187  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Women are exposed to indoor and outdoor artificial light at night (ALAN) in urban and rural environments. Excessive exposure to hazardous ALAN containing short wavelength light may suppress pineal melatonin production and lead to an increased breast cancer (BC) risk. Our objective was to address the differences in BC risks related to light exposure in urban and rural communities. We examined indoor and outdoor light habits of BC patients and controls that had lived in urban and rural areas in a 5-year period, 10 to 15 years before the time of the study. Individual data, night time sleeping habits and individual exposure to ALAN habits were collected using a questionnaire. A total of 252 women (110 BC patients and 142 controls) participated in this study. The sample was divided to subgroups according to dwelling area and disease status. Age matching was completed between all subgroups. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for urban and rural women separately, using binary logistic regression. OR results of urban population (92 BC patients and 72 control) revealed that BC risk increases with daily use of cellphone (OR = 2.13, 95% CI = 1.01-4.49, P < .05) and residence near strong ALAN sources (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 0.99-2.30, P < .06). Nevertheless, BC risk decreases if a woman was born in Israel (OR = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.21-0.93, P < .03), longer sleep duration (OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.53-1.05, P < .1), and reading with bed light illumination before retiring to sleep (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.61-0.96, P < .02). Furthermore, in the rural population (18 BC patients and 66 control) BC risk increases with the number of years past since the last menstruation (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.03-1.22, P < .01). However, BC risk decreases with longer sleep duration (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.24-1.14, P < .1), reading with room light illumination before retiring to sleep (OR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.29-1.06, P < .07), and sleeping with closed shutters during the night (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.41-1.04, P < .08). These data support the idea that indoor and outdoor nighttime light exposures differ between urban and rural women. Therefore, we suggest that women can influence BC risk and incidence by applying protective personal lighting habits. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed to strengthen the results.  
  Address University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 1534-7354 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27440788 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1492  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Keshet-Sitton, A.; Or-Chen, K.; Huber, E.; Haim, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Illuminating a Risk for Breast Cancer: A Preliminary Ecological Study on the Association Between Streetlight and Breast Cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Integrative Cancer Therapies Abbreviated Journal Integr Cancer Ther  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) for elongating photophase is a new source of pollution. We examined the association between measured ALAN levels and breast cancer (BC) standard morbidity ratio (SMR) at a statistical area (SA) level in an urban environment. Sample size consisted of 266 new BC cases ages 35-74. Light measurements (lux) were performed in 11 SAs. A new calculated variable of morbidity per SA size (SMR35-74/km2) was correlated with the light variables per road length, using Pearson correlations (P < .05, 1-tailed). Looking for a light threshold, we correlated percentage of light points above SA light intensity median with SMR35-74/km2 SMR35-74/km2 was significantly and positively strongly correlated with mean, median, and standard-deviation (SD) light intensity per road length (r = .79, P < .01, R2 = .63; r = .77, P < .01, R2 = .59; and r = .79, P < .01, R2 = .63). Light threshold results demonstrate a marginally significant positive moderate correlation between percentage of points above 16.3 lux and SMR35-74/km2 (r = .48, P < .07; R2 = .23). In situ results support the hypothesis that outdoor ALAN illumination is associated with a higher BC-SMR in a specific area and age group. Moreover, we suggest an outdoor light threshold of approximately 16 lux as the minimal intensity to affect melatonin levels and BC morbidity. To the best of our knowledge, our attempt is the first to use this method and show such association between streetlight intensity and BC morbidity and therefore should be further developed.  
  Address University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 1534-7354 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27899698 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1635  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rea, M.S.; Figueiro, M.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The NICU Lighted Environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Newborn and Infant Nursing Reviews Abbreviated Journal Newborn and Infant Nursing Reviews  
  Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 195-202  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Lighting technologies are rapidly evolving, creating many opportunities for good lighting within the NICU. With the widespread adoption of advanced solid-state lighting technologies, lighting no longer needs to be static. Rather, lighting systems can be more easily adjusted to the different and changing visual and non-visual needs of the professional staff, infants and family members throughout the 24-hour day. This paper provides a conceptual framework for defining good lighting in the NICU, recognizing the needs of various constituent groups, each with very different needs from the lighting. Several other papers on the topic of lighting for various constituent groups at different times of the day in the NICU are summarized. Attention is given specifically to the Recommended Standards for Newborn ICU Design, a consensus standard developed by a wide range of experts, to help the reader translate this conceptual framework to practice.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 1527-3369 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1528  
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Author Pocock, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Advanced lighting technology in controlled environment agriculture Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology  
  Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 83-94  
  Keywords Plants; Lighting  
  Abstract There is a recent awareness of the importance of plants in our everyday lives. Light is a requirement for plants and serves two important roles. It provides energy for growth and provides information that elicits plant responses including, among others, plant shape, pigmentation, nutritional content and resistance to stress. Light is paradoxical to plants, it is a requirement however, in excess it is damaging. Plants sense and interpret light through many families of photoreceptors and through the energy state of the photosynthetic apparatus. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are quickly replacing traditional light sources for human applications, and currently there is effort being put into tailoring these technology platforms for the plant community. Potential plant sensing pathways and the spectral effects on pigmentation and photochemistry in red lettuce are described.  
  Address  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (down) 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1383  
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