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Author Stone, R.A.; Cohen, Y.; McGlinn, A.M.; Davison, S.; Casavant, S.; Shaffer, J.; Khurana, T.S.; Pardue, M.T.; Iuvone, P.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Development of Experimental Myopia in Chicks in a Natural Environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science Abbreviated Journal Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci  
  Volume 57 Issue 11 Pages 4779-4789  
  Keywords Animals; Vision  
  Abstract PURPOSE: The hypothesis that outdoor exposure might protect against myopia has generated much interest, although available data find only modest clinical efficacy. We tested the effect of outdoor rearing on form-deprivation myopia in chicks, a myopia model markedly inhibited by high-intensity indoor laboratory lighting. METHODS: Unilaterally goggled cohorts of White Leghorn chicks were maintained in a species-appropriate, outdoor rural setting during daylight hours to the extent permitted by weather. Control chicks were reared indoors with incandescent lighting. Besides ocular refraction and ultrasound, we determined dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) content in retina and vitreous and measured mRNA expression levels of selected clock and circadian rhythm-related genes in the retina/RPE. RESULTS: Myopia developed in the goggled eyes of all cohorts. Whereas outdoor rearing lessened myopia by 44% at 4 days, a protective effect was no longer evident at 11 days. Outdoor rearing had no consistent effect on retinal or vitreous content of dopamine or DOPAC. Conforming to prior data on form-deprivation myopia, retina and vitreous levels of DOPAC were reduced in goggled eyes. Compared with contralateral eyes, the retinal expression of clock and circadian rhythm-related genes was modestly altered in myopic eyes of chicks reared indoors or outdoors. CONCLUSIONS: Outdoor rearing of chicks induces only a partial decrease of goggle-induced myopia that is not maintained, without evidence that retinal dopamine metabolism accounts for the partial myopia inhibition under these outdoor conditions. Although modest, alterations in retinal gene expression suggest that studying circadian signals might be informative for understanding refractive mechanisms.  
  Address Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States 7Department of Pharmacology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0146-0404 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27618415; PMCID:PMC5024671 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1538  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ohayon, M.M.; Milesi, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Outdoor Nighttime Lights Associate with Altered Sleep Behavior in the American General Population Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep  
  Volume 39 Issue 6 Pages 1311-1320  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing; Sleep  
  Abstract STUDY OBJECTIVES: Our study aims to explore the associations between outdoor nighttime lights (ONL) and sleep patterns in the human population. METHODS: Cross-sectional telephone study of a representative sample of the general US population age 18 y or older. 19,136 noninstitutionalized individuals (participation rate: 83.2%) were interviewed by telephone. The Sleep-EVAL expert system administered questions on life and sleeping habits; health; sleep, mental and organic disorders (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision; International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Second Edition; International Classification of Diseases, 10(th) Edition). Individuals were geolocated by longitude and latitude. Outdoor nighttime light measurements were obtained from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS), with nighttime passes taking place between 19:30 and 22:30 local time. Light data were correlated precisely to the geolocation of each participant of the general population sample. RESULTS: Living in areas with greater ONL was associated with delayed bedtime (P < 0.0001) and wake up time (P < 0.0001), shorter sleep duration (P < 0.01), and increased daytime sleepiness (P < 0.0001). Living in areas with greater ONL also increased the dissatisfaction with sleep quantity and quality (P < 0.0001) and the likelihood of having a diagnostic profile congruent with a circadian rhythm disorder (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Although they improve the overall safety of people and traffic, nighttime lights in our streets and cities are clearly linked with modifications in human sleep behaviors and also impinge on the daytime functioning of individuals living in areas with greater ONL.  
  Address NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27091523; PMCID:PMC4863221 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2551  
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Author Ball, L.J.; Palesh, O.; Kriegsfeld, L.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Pathophysiologic Role of Disrupted Circadian and Neuroendocrine Rhythms in Breast Carcinogenesis Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Endocrine Reviews Abbreviated Journal Endocrine Reviews  
  Volume Issue Pages er.2015-1133  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Most physiological processes in the brain and body exhibit daily (circadian) rhythms coordinated by an endogenous master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus that are essential for normal health and functioning. Exposure to sunlight during the day and darkness at night optimally entrains biological rhythms to promote homeostasis and human health. Unfortunately, a major consequence of the modern lifestyle is increased exposure to sun-free environments during the day and artificial lighting at night. Additionally, behavioral disruptions to circadian rhythms (i.e., repeated transmeridian flights, night or rotating shift work, or sleep disturbances) have a profound influence on health and have been linked to a number of pathological conditions, including endocrine-dependent cancers. Specifically, night shift work has been identified as a significant risk factor for breast cancer in industrialized countries. Several mechanisms have been proposed by which shift-work-induced circadian disruptions promote cancer. In this review, we examine the importance of the brain-body link through which circadian disruptions contribute to endocrine-dependent diseases, including breast carcinogenesis, by negatively impacting neuroendocrine and neuroimmune cells and consider preventive measures directed at maximizing circadian health.  
  Address  
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  ISSN (up) 0163-769X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1496  
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Author Aulsebrook, A.E.; Jones, T.M.; Rattenborg, N.C.; Roth, T.C. 2nd; Lesku, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep Ecophysiology: Integrating Neuroscience and Ecology Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends Ecol Evol  
  Volume 31 Issue 8 Pages 590-599  
  Keywords Commentary; Physiology  
  Abstract Here, we propose an original approach to explain one of the great unresolved questions in animal biology: what is the function of sleep? Existing ecological and neurological approaches to this question have become roadblocks to an answer. Ecologists typically treat sleep as a simple behavior, instead of a heterogeneous neurophysiological state, while neuroscientists generally fail to appreciate the critical insights offered by the consideration of ecology and evolutionary history. Redressing these shortfalls requires cross-disciplinary integration. By bringing together aspects of behavioral ecology, evolution, and conservation with neurophysiology, we can achieve a more comprehensive understanding of sleep, including its implications for adaptive waking behavior and fitness.  
  Address La Trobe University, School of Life Sciences, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: j.lesku@latrobe.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0169-5347 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27262386 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1462  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Polivka, T.N.; Wang, J.; Ellison, L.T.; Hyer, E.J.; Ichoku, C.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Improving Nocturnal Fire Detection With the VIIRS Day-Night Band Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sensing  
  Volume 54 Issue 9 Pages 5503-5519  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Building on existing techniques for satellite remote sensing of fires, this paper takes advantage of the day-night band (DNB) aboard the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) to develop the Firelight Detection Algorithm (FILDA), which characterizes fire pixels based on both visible-light and infrared (IR) signatures at night. By adjusting fire pixel selection criteria to include visible-light signatures, FILDA allows for significantly improved detection of pixels with smaller and/or cooler subpixel hotspots than the operational Interface Data Processing System (IDPS) algorithm. VIIRS scenes with near-coincident Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) overpasses are examined after applying the operational VIIRS fire product algorithm and including a modified “candidate fire pixel selection” approach from FILDA that lowers the 4-&#956;m brightness temperature (BT) threshold but includes a minimum DNB radiance. FILDA is shown to be effective in detecting gas flares and characterizing fire lines during large forest fires (such as the Rim Fire in California and High Park fire in Colorado). Compared with the operational VIIRS fire algorithm for the study period, FILDA shows a large increase (up to 90%) in the number of detected fire pixels that can be verified with the finer resolution ASTER data (90 m). Part (30%) of this increase is likely due to a combined use of DNB and lower 4-&#956;m BT thresholds for fire detection in FILDA. Although further studies are needed, quantitative use of the DNB to improve fire detection could lead to reduced response times to wildfires and better estimate of fire characteristics (smoldering and flaming) at night.  
  Address  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0196-2892 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1781  
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