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Author Zamorano, J.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Ocaña, F.; Pila-Diez, B.; Gómez Castaño, J.; Pascual, S.; Tapia, C.; Gallego, J.; Fernandez, A.; Nievas, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Testing sky brightness models against radial dependency: a dense two dimensional survey around the city of Madrid, Spain Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal JQSRT  
  Volume 181 Issue (up) Pages 52-66  
  Keywords Skyglow; measurements; light pollution; artificial light at night; modeling; Madrid; Spain  
  Abstract We present a study of the night sky brightness around the extended metropolitan area of Madrid using Sky Quality Meter (SQM) photometers. The map is the first to cover the spatial distribution of the sky brightness in the center of the Iberian peninsula. These surveys are neccessary to test the light pollution models that predict night sky brightness as a function of the location and brightness of the sources of light pollution and the scattering of light in the atmosphere. We describe the data-retrieval methodology, which includes an automated procedure to measure from a moving vehicle in order to speed up the data collection, providing a denser and wider survey than previous works with similar time frames. We compare the night sky brightness map to the nocturnal radiance measured from space by the DMSP satellite. We find that i) a single source model is not enough to explain the radial evolution of the night sky brightness, despite the predominance of Madrid in size and population, and ii) that the orography of the region should be taken into account when deriving geo-specific models from general first-principles models. We show the tight relationship between these two luminance measures. This finding sets up an alternative roadmap to extended studies over the globe that will not require the local deployment of photometers or trained personnel.  
  Address Dept. Astrof´ısica y CC. de la Atm´osfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1323  
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Author Okuliarova, M.; Molcan, L.; Zeman, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Decreased emotional reactivity of rats exposed to repeated phase shifts of light-dark cycle Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiology & Behavior  
  Volume 156 Issue (up) Pages 16-23  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Disturbed light–dark (LD) cycles are associated with circadian disruption of physiological and behavioural rhythms and in turn with an increased risk of disease development. However, direct causal links and underlying mechanisms leading to negative health consequences still need to be revealed. In the present study, we exposed male Wistar rats to repeated phase shifts of LD cycle and analysed their ability to cope with mild emotional stressors. In experiment 1, rats were submitted to either a regular 12:12 LD cycle (CTRL rats) or 8-h phase delay shifts applied every 2 days for 5 weeks (SHIFT rats). Subsequently, the behaviour was examined in the open-field, black–white box and elevated plus maze tests. In experiment 2, changes in blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) as well as the activity of autonomic nervous system were measured in telemeterised rats in response to open-field and black–white box tests before and after 5-week exposure to shifted LD regime. Locomotor activity was consistently higher in SHIFT than CTRL rats in in the open-field and black–white box tests. Interestingly, in the elevated plus maze, SHIFT rats displayed increased risk assessment and decreased grooming compared to CTRL rats. Anxiety measures were affected only in the black–white box, where SHIFT rats displayed reduced anxiety-like behaviour compared to CTRL rats. Differences in behavioural reactivity between SHIFT and CTRL rats did not correspond with BP and HR changes. However, exposure to phase shifts increased the sympathovagal reactivity in the black–white box. Together, our results demonstrated that disturbed LD conditions decreased emotional reactivity of rats and affected their ability to cope with emotional stressors denoting an additional risk mechanism linking disrupted circadian organisation to adverse health effects.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1331  
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Author Sliney, D.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is light? The visible spectrum and beyond Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Eye (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Eye (Lond)  
  Volume Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; human vision; spectrum; electromagnetic spectrum; visible; *Ultraviolet Rays; light  
  Abstract In this International Year of Light, it is particularly appropriate to review the historical concept of what is light and the controversies surrounding the extent of the visible spectrum. Today we recognize that light possesses both a wave and particle nature. It is also clear that the limits of visibility really extend from about 310 nm in the ultraviolet (in youth) to about 1100 nm in the near-infrared, but depend very much on the radiance, that is, 'brightness' of the light source. The spectral content of artificial lighting are undergoing very significant changes in our lifetime, and the full biological implications of the spectral content of newer lighting technologies remain to be fully explored.  
  Address Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0950-222X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26768917 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1337  
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Author Yang, Y.-F.; Jiang, J.-S.; Pan, J.-M.; Ying, Y.-B.; Wang, X.-S.; Zhang, M.-L.; Lu, M.-S.; Chen, X.-H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The relationship of spectral sensitivity with growth and reproductive response in avian breeders (Gallus gallus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 6 Issue (up) Pages 19291  
  Keywords Animals; birds; Gallus gallus; spectrum; *Reproduction; photobiology; biology  
  Abstract A previous study demonstrated that birds that are exposed to light at night develop advanced reproductive systems. However, spectrum might also affect the photoperiodic response of birds. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of spectral composition on the growth and reproductive physiology of female breeders, using pure light-emitting diode spectra. A total of 1,000 newly hatched female avian breeders (Gallus gallus) were equally allocated to white-, red-, yellow-, green- and blue-light treated groups. We found that blue-light treated birds had a greater and faster weight gain than did red- and yellow-light treated birds (P = 0.02 and 0.05). The red light expedited the sexual maturation of the chicks, whose age at sexual maturity was 7 and 14 days earlier than that of the green- and blue-light treated birds, respectively. The accumulative egg production of the red-light treated birds was 9 and 8 eggs more than that of the blue- and green-light treated birds. The peak lay rate of the red-light treated groups was significantly greater than the blue-light treated birds (P = 0.028). In conclusion, exposure to short-wavelength light appears to promote growth of female breeder birds, whereas exposure to long-wavelength light appears to accelerate reproductive performance.  
  Address Zhejiang Guangda Breeding Poultry Corporation, Jiaxing 314423, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26765747 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1338  
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Author Rodríguez Martín, A.; Chiaradia, A.; Wasiak, P.; Renwick, L.; Dann, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Waddling on the Dark Side: Ambient Light Affects Attendance Behavior of Little Penguins Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume 0748730415626010 Issue (up) Pages  
  Keywords Animals; birds; penguins; attendance; little penguin; Eudyptula minor; Phillip Island; Australia; photobiology; seabirds  
  Abstract Visible light on Earth largely comes from the sun, including light reflected from the moon. Predation risk is strongly determined by light conditions, and some animals are nocturnal to reduce predation. Artificial lights and its consequent light pollution may disrupt this natural behavior. Here, we used 13 years of attendance data to study the effects of sun, moon, and artificial light on the attendance pattern of a nocturnal seabird, the little penguin Eudyptula minor at Phillip Island, Australia. The little penguin is the smallest and the only penguin species whose activity on land is strictly nocturnal. Automated monitoring systems recorded individually marked penguins every time they arrived (after sunset) at or departed (before sunrise) from 2 colonies under different lighting conditions: natural night skylight and artificial lights (around 3 lux) used to enhance penguin viewing for ecotourism around sunset. Sunlight had a strong effect on attendance as penguins arrived on average around 81 min after sunset and departed around 92 min before sunrise. The effect of moonlight was also strong, varying according to moon phase. Fewer penguins came ashore during full moon nights. Moon phase effect was stronger on departure than arrival times. Thus, during nights between full moon and last quarter, arrival times (after sunset) were delayed, even though moonlight levels were low, while departure times (before sunrise) were earlier, coinciding with high moonlight levels. Cyclic patterns of moon effect were slightly out of phase but significantly between 2 colonies, which could be due to site-specific differences or presence/absence of artificial lights. Moonlight could be overridden by artificial light at our artificially lit colony, but the similar amplitude of attendance patterns between colonies suggests that artificial light did not mask the moonlight effect. Further research is indeed necessary to understand how seabirds respond to the increasing artificial night light levels.  
  Address Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Estación Biológica de Doñana, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Avda. Américo Vespucio s/n, 41092 Seville, Spain; airamrguez(at)ebd.csic.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1345  
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