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Author Honnen, A.-C.; Johnston, P.R.; Monaghan, M.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sex-specific gene expression in the mosquito Culex pipiens f. molestus in response to artificial light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication BMC Genomics Abbreviated Journal BMC Genomics  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 22  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a typical feature of urban areas and most organisms living in urban or suburban habitats are exposed to low levels of ALAN. Light is one of the most important environmental cues that organisms use to regulate their activities. Studies have begun to quantify the influence of ALAN on the behavior and ecology of organisms, but research on the effects at the molecular level remains limited. Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex (Diptera, Culicidae) are widespread and abundant in urban areas where they are potential disease vectors. It is thus of particular interest to understand how ALAN may influence biologically and ecologically relevant traits. RESULTS: We used RNAseq to evaluate the transcriptome response in a Cx. pipiens f. molestus laboratory population that was exposed to near-natural light conditions (light:dark L16:D8 hours, “control”) and ALAN conditions with 3 h of constant low-level light at night (L16 + Llow3:D5 hours, “low-light”). The resulting transcripts were mapped to the reference genome of the closely related Culex quinquefasciatus. Female expression patterns differed significantly between control and treatment conditions at five genes although none showed an absolute fold change greater than two (FC > 2). In contrast, male expression differed at 230 genes (74 with FC > 2). Of these, 216 genes (72 with FC > 2) showed reduced expression in the low-light treatment, most of which were related to gametogenesis, lipid metabolism, and immunity. Of the 14 genes (two with FC > 2) with increased expression, only five had any functional annotation. There was a pronounced sex-bias in gene expression regardless of treatment, with 11,660 genes (51 % of annotated genes; 8694 with FC > 2; 48 % of annotated genes) differentially expressed between males and females, including 14 genes of the circadian clock. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest a stronger response to artificial light by males of Cx. pipiens f. molestus than by females, and that a wide range of physiological pathways may be affected by ALAN at the molecular level. The fact that differences in gene expression appear to be sex-specific may have a strong influence at the population level.  
  Address Berlin Center for Genomics in Biodiversity Research, Konigin-Luise-Strasse 6-8, 14195, Berlin, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2164 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26728786; PMCID:PMC4700752 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1332  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Farnworth, B.; Innes, J.; Waas, J.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Converting Predation Cues into Conservation Tools: The Effect of Light on Mouse Foraging Behaviour Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages e0145432  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Prey face a conflict between acquiring energy and avoiding predators and use both direct and indirect cues to assess predation risk. Illumination, an indirect cue, influences nocturnal rodent foraging behaviour. New Zealand holds no native rodent species but has introduced mice (Mus musculus) that severely impair native biodiversity. We used Giving-Up Densities (GUDs) and observations of foraging frequency and duration to assess if artificial light induces risk avoidance behaviour in mice and could limit their activity. We found both captive (wild strain) mice in outdoor pens and wild mice within a pest fenced sanctuary (Maungatautari, New Zealand) displayed avoidance behaviour in response to illumination. In captivity, total foraging effort was similar across lit and unlit pens but mice displayed a strong preference for removing seeds from dark control areas (mean: 15.33 SD: +/-11.64 per 3.5 hours) over illuminated areas (2.00 +/-3.44). Wild mice also removed fewer seeds from illuminated areas (0.42 +/-1.00 per 12 hours) compared to controls (6.67 +/-9.20). Captive mice spent less than 1.0% of available time at illuminated areas, versus 11.3% at controls; visited the lit areas less than control areas (12.00 +/- 9.77 versus 29.00 +/-21.58 visits respectively); and spent less time per visit at illuminated versus control areas (8.17 +/-7.83 versus 44.83 +/-87.52 seconds per visit respectively). Illumination could provide protection at ecologically sensitive sites, damaged exclusion fences awaiting repair, fence terminus zones of peninsula sanctuaries and shipping docks that service offshore islands. We promote the hypothesis that the tendency of mice to avoid illumination could be a useful conservation tool, and advance knowledge of risk assessment and foraging under perceived danger.  
  Address University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26760039 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1339  
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Author Shafiei Sabet, S.; Van Dooren, D.; Slabbekoorn, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Son et lumiere: Sound and light effects on spatial distribution and swimming behavior in captive zebrafish Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut  
  Volume 212 Issue Pages 480-488  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Aquatic and terrestrial habitats are heterogeneous by nature with respect to sound and light conditions. Fish may extract signals and exploit cues from both ambient modalities and they may also select their sound and light level of preference in free-ranging conditions. In recent decades, human activities in or near water have altered natural soundscapes and caused nocturnal light pollution to become more widespread. Artificial sound and light may cause anxiety, deterrence, disturbance or masking, but few studies have addressed in any detail how fishes respond to spatial variation in these two modalities. Here we investigated whether sound and light affected spatial distribution and swimming behavior of individual zebrafish that had a choice between two fish tanks: a treatment tank and a quiet and light escape tank. The treatments concerned a 2 x 2 design with noisy or quiet conditions and dim or bright light. Sound and light treatments did not induce spatial preferences for the treatment or escape tank, but caused various behavioral changes in both spatial distribution and swimming behavior within the treatment tank. Sound exposure led to more freezing and less time spent near the active speaker. Dim light conditions led to a lower number of crossings, more time spent in the upper layer and less time spent close to the tube for crossing. No interactions were found between sound and light conditions. This study highlights the potential relevance for studying multiple modalities when investigating fish behavior and further studies are needed to investigate whether similar patterns can be found for fish behavior in free-ranging conditions.  
  Address Behavioral Biology, Institute of Biology Leiden (IBL), Leiden University, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26963699 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1369  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nickla, D.L.; Totonelly, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brief light exposure at night disrupts the circadian rhythms in eye growth and choroidal thickness in chicks Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Experimental eye Research Abbreviated Journal Exp Eye Res  
  Volume 146 Issue Pages 189-195  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Changes in ocular growth that lead to myopia or hyperopia are associated with alterations in the circadian rhythms in eye growth, choroidal thickness and intraocular pressure in animal models of emmetropization. Recent studies have shown that light at night has deleterious effects on human health, acting via “circadian disruptions” of various diurnal rhythms, including changes in phase or amplitude. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of brief, 2-hour episodes of light in the middle of the night on the rhythms in axial length and choroidal thickness, and whether these alter eye growth and refractive error in the chick model of myopia. Starting at 2 weeks of age, birds received 2 hours of light between 12:00 am and 2:00 am for 7 days (n=12; total hours of light: 14 hrs). Age-matched controls had a continuous dark night (n=14; 14L/10D). Ocular dimensions were measured using high-frequency A-scan ultrasonography on the first day of the experiment, and again on day 7, at 6-hour intervals, starting at noon (12pm, 6pm, 12am, 6am, 12pm). Measurements during the night were done under a photographic safe-light. These data were used to determine rhythm parameters of phase and amplitude. 2 groups of birds, both experimental (light at night) and control, were measured with ultrasound at various intervals over the course of 4 weeks to determine growth rates. Refractive errors were measured in 6 experimental and 6 control birds at the end of 2 weeks. Eyes of birds in a normal L/D cycle showed sinusoidal 24-hour period diurnal rhythms in axial length and choroid thickness. Light in the middle of the night caused changes in both the rhythms in axial length and choroidal thickness, such that neither could be fit to a sine function having a period of 24 hours. Light caused an acute, transient stimulation in ocular growth rate in the subsequent 6-hour period (12 am to 6 am), that may be responsible for the increased growth rate seen 4 weeks later, and the more myopic refractive error. It also abolished the increase in choroidal thickness that normally occurs between 6 pm and 12 am. We conclude that light at night alters the rhythms in axial length and choroidal thickness in an animal model of eye growth, and that these circadian disruptions might lead to the development of ametropias. These results have implications for the use of light during the night in children.  
  Address The New England College of Optometry, Boston, MA, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0014-4835 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26970497 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1371  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Beck, W.; Gobatto, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of high wavelengths low intensity light during dark period on physical exercise performance, biochemical and haematological parameters of swimming rats Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Acta Physiologica Hungarica Abbreviated Journal Acta Physiol Hung  
  Volume 103 Issue 1 Pages 112-120  
  Keywords (up) Animals  
  Abstract Nocturnal rodents should be assessed at an appropriate time of day, which leads to a challenge in identifying an adequate environmental light which allows animal visualisation without perturbing physiological homeostasis. Thus, we analysed the influence of high wavelength and low intensity light during dark period on physical exercise and biochemical and haematological parameters of nocturnal rats. We submitted 80 animals to an exhaustive exercise at individualised intensity under two different illuminations during dark period. Red light (> 600 nm; < 15lux) was applied constantly during dark period (EI; for experimental illumination groups) or only for handling and assessments (SI; for standard illumination groups). EI led to worse haematological and biochemical conditions, demonstrating that EI alone can influence physiological parameters and jeopardise result interpretation. SI promotes normal physiological conditions and greater aerobic tolerance than EI, showing the importance of a correct illumination pattern for all researchers that employ nocturnal rats for health/disease or sports performance experiments.  
  Address Laboratory of Applied Sport Physiology, School of Physical Education, University of Campinas , Sao Paulo , Brasil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0231-424X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27030633 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1410  
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