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Author Falchi, F.; Cinzano, P.; Duriscoe, D.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Elvidge, C.D.; Baugh, K.; Portnov, B.A.; Rybnikova, N.A.; Furgoni, R.
Title The new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal Science Advances
Volume 2 Issue 6 Pages e1600377-e1600377
Keywords Skyglow; Conservation; Remote Sensing
Abstract Artificial lights raise night sky luminance, creating the most visible effect of light pollution—artificial skyglow. Despite the increasing interest among scientists in fields such as ecology, astronomy, health care, and land-use planning, light pollution lacks a current quantification of its magnitude on a global scale. To overcome this, we present the world atlas of artificial sky luminance, computed with our light pollution propagation software using new high-resolution satellite data and new precision sky brightness measurements. This atlas shows that more than 80% of the world and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies. The Milky Way is hidden from more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans. Moreover, 23% of the world’s land surfaces between 75°N and 60°S, 88% of Europe, and almost half of the United States experience light-polluted nights.
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ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1466
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Author Da Silva, A.; Valcu, M.; Kempenaers, B.
Title Behavioural plasticity in the onset of dawn song under intermittent experimental night lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour
Volume 117 Issue Pages 155-165
Keywords Animals
Abstract The disruption of daily rhythms is one of the most studied ecological consequences of light pollution. Previous work showed that several songbird species initiated dawn song earlier in areas with light pollution. However, the mechanisms underlying this shift are still unknown. Individuals may immediately adjust their timing of singing to the presence of artificial light (behavioural plasticity), but the observed effect may also be due to phenotype-dependent habitat choice, effects of conditions during early life or micro-evolution. The main aim of this study was to experimentally investigate how males of four common passerine species respond to day-to-day variation in the presence of artificial night lighting in terms of the timing of singing. During two consecutive breeding seasons, we manipulated the presence of light throughout the night in a cyclic fashion in several naturally undisturbed forest patches. We show that individuals of all four species immediately and reversibly adjusted their onset of dawn singing in response to artificial light. The effect was strongest in the European robin, but relatively small in the blue tit, the great tit and the blackbird. The effect in the latter two species was smaller than expected from the correlational studies. This may be coincidence (small sample size of this study), but it could also indicate that there are longer-term effects of living in light-polluted urban areas on timing of dawn singing, or that birds use compensatory behaviours such as light avoidance. We found no evidence that our light treatment had carryover effects into the subsequent dark period, but robins progressively advanced their dawn singing during the light treatment.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1467
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Author Borniger, J.C.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Photoperiodic Regulation of Behavior: Peromyscus as a Model System Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology Abbreviated Journal Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages 946-948
Keywords Animals
Abstract Winter and summer present vastly different challenges to animals living outside of the tropics. To survive and reproduce, individuals must anticipate seasonal environmental changes and adjust physiology and behavior accordingly. Photoperiod (day length) offers a relatively ‘noise free’ environmental signal that non-tropical animals use to tell the time of year, and whether winter is approaching or receding. In some cases, photoperiodic signals may be fine-tuned by other proximate cues such as food availability or temperature. The pineal hormone, melatonin, is a primary physiological transducer of the photoperiodic signal. It tracks night length and provokes changes in physiology and behavior at appropriate times of the year. Because of their wide latitudinal distribution, Peromyscus has been well studied in the context of photoperiodic regulation of physiology and behavior. Here, we discuss how photoperiodic signals are transduced by pineal melatonin, how melatonin acts on target tissues, and subsequent consequences for behavior. Using a life-history paradigm involving trade-offs between the immune and reproductive systems, specific emphasis is placed on aggression, metabolism, and cognition. We discuss future directions including examining the effects of light pollution on photoperiodism, genetic manipulations to test the role of specific genes in the photoperiodic response, and using Peromyscus to test evolutionary theories of aging.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 1084-9521 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1469
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Author Lucassen, E. A.; Coomans, C. P.; van Putten, M.; de Kreij, S. R.; van Genugten, J. H.L.T.; Sutorius, R. P.M.; de Rooij, K. E.; van der Velde, M.; Verhoeve, S. L.; Smit, J. W.A.; Löwik, C. W.G.M.; Smits, H. H.; Guigas, B.; Aartsma-Rus, A. M.; Meijer, J. H.
Title Environmental 24-hr Cycles Are Essential for Health Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Current Biology Abbreviated Journal Current Biology
Volume 26 Issue 14 Pages 1843-1853
Keywords Animals
Abstract Circadian rhythms are deeply rooted in the biology of virtually all organisms. The pervasive use of artificial lighting in modern society disrupts circadian rhythms and can be detrimental to our health. To investigate the relationship between disrupting circadian rhythmicity and disease, we exposed mice to continuous light (LL) for 24 weeks and measured several major health parameters. Long-term neuronal recordings revealed that 24 weeks of LL reduced rhythmicity in the central circadian pacemaker of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) by 70%. Strikingly, LL exposure also reduced skeletal muscle function (forelimb grip strength, wire hanging duration, and grid hanging duration), caused trabecular bone deterioration, and induced a transient pro-inflammatory state. After the mice were returned to a standard light-dark cycle, the SCN neurons rapidly recovered their normal high-amplitude rhythm, and the aforementioned health parameters returned to normal. These findings strongly suggest that a disrupted circadian rhythm reversibly induces detrimental effects on multiple biological processes.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1480
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Author Dorado-Correa, A.M.; Rodríguez-Rocha, M.; Brumm, H.
Title Anthropogenic noise, but not artificial light levels predicts song behaviour in an equatorial bird Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal R. Soc. open sci.
Volume 3 Issue 7 Pages 160231
Keywords Animals
Abstract Birds in cities start singing earlier in the morning than in rural areas; commonly this shift is attributed to light pollution. Some studies have suggested that traffic noise has a stronger influence on singing activity than artificial light does. Changes in the timing of singing behaviour in relation to noise and light pollution have only been investigated in the temperate zones. Tropical birds, however, experience little seasonal variation in day length and may be less dependent on light intensity as a modifier for reproductive behaviours such as song. To test whether noise or light pollution has a stronger impact on the dawn chorus of a tropical bird, we investigated the singing behaviour of rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis) in Bogota, Colombia at two times during the year. We found that birds in places with high noise levels started to sing earlier. Light pollution did not have a significant effect. Birds may begin to sing earlier in noisy areas to avoid acoustic masking by traffic later in the morning. Our results also suggest that some tropical birds may be less sensitive to variations in day length and thus less sensitive to light pollution.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 2054-5703 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1484
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