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Author Pacheco, Y.M.; Martin, G.J.; Bybee, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title On the Phototactic Response of RwandanDiaphanesMotschulsky (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) to a Trap with a 630Nm Red Light Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Coleopterists Bulletin Abbreviated Journal The Coleopterists Bulletin  
  Volume 70 Issue 3 Pages 559-561  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0010-065X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1531  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Muralidhar, P.; Srihari, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Excessive light is another form of pollution on the environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication ACADEMICIA: An International Multidisciplinary Research Journal Abbreviated Journal Academicia: An Inter. Multidiscipl. Rese. Jour.  
  Volume 6 Issue 8 Pages 19  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2249-7137 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1535  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cozzolino, E.; Lasta, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Use of VIIRS DNB satellite images to detect jigger ships involved in the Illex argentinus fishery Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment  
  Volume 4 Issue Pages 167-178  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The distribution of Illex argentinus squid extends from 23°S to 54°S. The largest catches of the species, which represents one of the most important fisheries in Argentina, take place between 35°S and 52°S. Argentina's fisheries administration keeps close records of the Argentine fleet position and the Cephalopod laboratory at the Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Desarrollo Pesquero (INIDEP) monitors and suggests actions for the management of the resource. The catches are carried out both within national and adjacent international waters. Fleets from different countries participate in the fisheries operating jigger vessels during the night with strong lights to attract the squid. One of the greatest difficulties in the evaluation of the status of this resource is to know the number of foreign vessels fishing outside the Argentine Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer (VIIRS) day/night band (DNB) satellite images are a useful tool to monitor and quantify these fleets, building on the capacity of the sensors to detect the light emitted by the lamps placed on the ship decks. In this work, we report the development of a specific new method (set of algorithms) to process the images and identify automatically the jigger ships that compose the overseas fleet. Results were validated using the positioning data of the Argentine jigger fleet and comparing light emissions of these vessels against those identified by the new method. The process of identifying ships has proved to be robust considering the statistical results obtained: mean relative error (MRE) of 0.03% and a root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 1.62 ships.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2352-9385 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1536  
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Author Travis, R.C.; Balkwill, A.; Fensom, G.K.; Appleby, P.N.; Reeves, G.K.; Wang, X.-S.; Roddam, A.W.; Gathani, T.; Peto, R.; Green, J.; Key, T.J.; Beral, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night Shift Work and Breast Cancer Incidence: Three Prospective Studies and Meta-analysis of Published Studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of the National Cancer Institute Abbreviated Journal JNCI J Natl Cancer Inst  
  Volume 108 Issue 12 Pages djw169  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Background: It has been proposed that night shift work could increase breast cancer incidence. A 2007 World Health Organization review concluded, mainly from animal evidence, that shift work involving circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans. We therefore aimed to generate prospective epidemiological evidence on night shift work and breast cancer incidence.

Methods: Overall, 522 246 Million Women Study, 22 559 EPIC-Oxford, and 251 045 UK Biobank participants answered questions on shift work and were followed for incident cancer. Cox regression yielded multivariable-adjusted breast cancer incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for night shift work vs no night shift work, and likelihood ratio tests for interaction were used to assess heterogeneity. Our meta-analyses combined these and relative risks from the seven previously published prospective studies (1.4 million women in total), using inverse-variance weighted averages of the study-specific log RRs.

Results: In the Million Women Study, EPIC-Oxford, and UK Biobank, respectively, 673, 28, and 67 women who reported night shift work developed breast cancer, and the RRs for any vs no night shift work were 1.00 (95% CI = 0.92 to 1.08), 1.07 (95% CI = 0.71 to 1.62), and 0.78 (95% CI = 0.61 to 1.00). In the Million Women Study, the RR for 20 or more years of night shift work was 1.00 (95% CI = 0.81 to 1.23), with no statistically significant heterogeneity by sleep patterns or breast cancer risk factors. Our meta-analysis of all 10 prospective studies included 4660 breast cancers in women reporting night shift work; compared with other women, the combined relative risks were 0.99 (95% CI = 0.95 to 1.03) for any night shift work, 1.01 (95% CI = 0.93 to 1.10) for 20 or more years of night shift work, and 1.00 (95% CI = 0.87 to 1.14) for 30 or more years.

Conclusions: The totality of the prospective evidence shows that night shift work, including long-term shift work, has little or no effect on breast cancer incidence.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8874 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1540  
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Author Wakefield, A.; Broyles, M.; Stone, E.L.; Jones, G.; Harris, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Experimentally comparing the attractiveness of domestic lights to insects: Do LEDs attract fewer insects than conventional light types? Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol  
  Volume 6 Issue 22 Pages 8028-8036  
  Keywords ecology; Lighting  
  Abstract LED lighting is predicted to constitute 70% of the outdoor and residential lighting markets by 2020. While the use of LEDs promotes energy and cost savings relative to traditional lighting technologies, little is known about the effects these broad-spectrum “white” lights will have on wildlife, human health, animal welfare, and disease transmission. We conducted field experiments to compare the relative attractiveness of four commercially available “domestic” lights, one traditional (tungsten filament) and three modern (compact fluorescent, “cool-white” LED and “warm-white” LED), to aerial insects, particularly Diptera. We found that LEDs attracted significantly fewer insects than other light sources, but found no significant difference in attraction between the “cool-” and “warm-white” LEDs. Fewer flies were attracted to LEDs than alternate light sources, including fewer Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Use of LEDs has the potential to mitigate disturbances to wildlife and occurrences of insect-borne diseases relative to competing lighting technologies. However, we discuss the risks associated with broad-spectrum lighting and net increases in lighting resulting from reduced costs of LED technology.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1541  
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