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Author Voigt, L.P.; Reynolds, K.; Mehryar, M.; Chan, W.S.; Kostelecky, N.; Pastores, S.M.; Halpern, N.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Monitoring sound and light continuously in an intensive care unit patient room: A pilot study Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Critical Care Abbreviated Journal Journal of Critical Care  
  Volume 38 Issue 21 Pages 5952-5961  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Human Health  
  Abstract Purpose

To determine the feasibility of continuous recording of sound and light in the intensive care unit (ICU).

Materials and Methods

Four one-hour baseline scenarios in an empty ICU patient room by day and night (doors open or closed and maximal or minimal lighting) and two daytime scenarios simulating a stable and unstable patient (quiet or loud devices and staff) were conducted. Sound and light levels were continuously recorded using a commercially available multisensor monitor and transmitted via the hospital's network to a cloud-based data storage and management system.

Results

The empty ICU room was loud with similar mean sound levels for the day and night simulations of 45–46 dBA. Mean levels for maximal lighting during day and night ranged from 1306–1812 lux and mean levels for minimum lighting were 1–3 lux. The mean sound levels for the stable and unstable patient simulations were 61 and 81 dBA, respectively. The mean light levels were 349 lux for the stable patient and 1947 lux for the unstable patient.

Conclusions

Combined sound and light can be continuously and easily monitored in the ICU setting. Incorporating sound and light monitors in ICU rooms may promote an enhanced patient and staff centered healing environment.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language (up) Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0883-9441 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1614  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Son, K.-H.; Jeon, Y.-M.; Oh, M.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Application of supplementary white and pulsed light-emitting diodes to lettuce grown in a plant factory with artificial lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Horticulture, Environment, and Biotechnology Abbreviated Journal Hortic. Environ. Biotechnol.  
  Volume 57 Issue 6 Pages 560-572  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are currently undergoing rapid development as plant growth light sources in a plant factory with artificial lighting (PFAL). However, little is known about the effects of supplementary light and pulsed LEDs on plant growth, bioactive compound productions, and energy efficiency in lettuce. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of supplementary white LEDs (study I) and pulsed LEDs (study II) on red leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. ‘Sunmang’). In study I, six LED sources were used to determine the effects of supplementary white LEDs (RGB 7:1:1, 7:1:2, RWB 7:1:2, 7:2:1, 8:1:1, 8:2:0 [based on chip number] on lettuce). Fluorescent lamps were used as the control. In study II, pulsed RWB 7:2:1 LED treatments (30, 10, 1 kHz with a 50 or 75% duty ratio) were applied to lettuce. In study I, the application of red and blue fractions improved plant growth characteristics and the accumulation of antioxidant phenolic compounds, respectively. In addition, the application of green light increased plant growth, including the fresh and dry weights of shoots and roots, as well as leaf area. However, the substitution of green LEDs with white LEDs induced approximately 3.4-times higher light and energy use efficiency. In study II, the growth characteristics and photosynthesis of lettuce were affected by various combinations of duty ratio and frequency. In particular, biomass under a 1 kHz 75% duty ratio of pulsed LEDs was not significantly different from that of the control (continuous LEDs). Moreover, no significant difference in leaf photosynthetic rate was observed between any pulsed LED treatment utilizing a 75% duty ratio versus continuous LEDs. However, some pulsed LED treatments may potentially improve light and energy use efficiency compared to continuous LEDs. These results suggest that the fraction of red, blue, and green wavelengths of LEDs is an important factor for plant growth and the biosynthesis of bioactive compounds in lettuce and that supplementary white LEDs (based on a combination of red and blue LEDs) might be more suitable as a commercial lighting source than green LEDs. In addition, the use of suitable pulses of LEDs might save energy while inducing plant growth similar to that under continuous LEDs. Our findings provide important basic information for designing optimal light sources for use in a PFAL.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2211-3452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1615  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bullough, J.D.; Skinner, N.P.; Plummer, T.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessment of an Adaptive Driving Beam Headlighting System: Visibility and Glare Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Abbreviated Journal Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board  
  Volume 2555 Issue Pages 81-85  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract Recent developments in solid-state lighting, sensor, and control technologies make new configurations for vehicle forward lighting feasible. Adaptive driving beam (ADB) systems build on systems that automatically switch from high- to low-beam headlights in the presence of oncoming vehicles. ADB systems can detect oncoming headlights and preceding taillights and reduce their intensity only in the direction of the other lights, while they maintain higher levels of illumination throughout the remainder of the field of view. The nominal benefit of ADB systems is the provision of high-beam levels of illumination in the forward scene, while glare is reduced to oncoming and preceding drivers, who perceive low-beam illumination levels. In this study, two dynamic field experiments were conducted: one experiment measured the ability of observers to identify the walking direction of roadside pedestrian targets with and without the use of the ADB system; the other experiment evaluated the discomfort glare elicited by the ADB system compared with the glare from conventional low- and high-beam headlights. The findings from both experiments were consistent with previous analytical and static field tests and suggested that ADB systems can offer safety benefits beyond those offered by conventional headlight systems.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0361-1981 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1618  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shih, K.-T.; Liu, J.-S.; Shyu, F.; Yeh, S.-L.; Chen, H.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Blocking harmful blue light while preserving image color appearance Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication ACM Transactions on Graphics Abbreviated Journal Tog  
  Volume 35 Issue 6 Pages 1-10  
  Keywords Lighting; Vision  
  Abstract Recent study in vision science has shown that blue light in a certain frequency band affects human circadian rhythm and impairs our health. Although applying a light blocker to an image display can block the harmful blue light, it inevitably makes an image look like an aged photo. In this paper, we show that it is possible to reduce harmful blue light while preserving the blue appearance of an image. Moreover, we optimize the spectral transmittance profile of blue light blocker based on psychophysical data and develop a color compensation algorithm to minimize color distortion. A prototype using notch filters is built as a proof of concept.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0730-0301 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1640  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Daoud-Opit, S.; Jones, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Guided by the light: Roost choice and behaviour of urban Rainbow Lorikeets (Trichoglossus haematodus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication European Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages 72-80  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract 1. The formation of large communal roosts is a conspicuous phenomenon associated with a wide range of bird species successfully exploiting urban environments. In many Australian cities, the abundance of the Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), a native parrot, has increased markedly in recent decades, with the species roosting in very large numbers within suburban sites. These roosting locations are noisy and cause significant fouling of the land beneath, resulting in conflict with humans.

2. We investigated the selection of roosting sites in this species in Brisbane, Australia, by comparing characteristics of both the general sites of these roosts as well as individual trees used within roosting sites and trees that were avoided.

3. Lorikeets used a wide variety of tree types for roosting but demonstrated a clear preference for clumped trees within sparsely treed areas that received significantly more artificial light at night than otherwise suitable sites and trees nearby.

4. These features of roosting sites may enhance the detection of nocturnal predators by Rainbow Lorikeets, suggesting a potential positive impact of anthropogenic lighting. Our findings provide valuable insights into the management of roost-related conflicts in urban areas. We encourage further investigations into the possible benefits of artificial light.
 
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1339-8474 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1641  
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