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Author Azam, C.; Le Viol, I.; Julien, J.-F.; Bas, Y.; Kerbiriou, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Disentangling the relative effect of light pollution, impervious surfaces and intensive agriculture on bat activity with a national-scale monitoring program Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal Landscape Ecol  
  Volume 31 Issue 10 Pages 2471-2483  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Context

Light pollution is a global change affecting a major proportion of global land surface. Although the impacts of Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) have been documented locally for many taxa, the extent of effect of ALAN at a landscape scale on biodiversity is unknown.

Objectives

We characterized the landscape-scale impacts of ALAN on 4 insectivorous bat species Pipistrellus pipistrellus, Pipistrellus kuhlii, Eptesicus serotinus, Nyctalus leisleri, and compared the extent of their effects to other major land-use pressures.

Methods

We used a French national-scale monitoring program recording bat activity among 2-km car transect surveys, and extracted landscape characteristics around transects with satellite and land cover layers. For each species, we performed multi-model averaging at 4 landscape scales (from 200 to 1000 m buffers around transects) to compare the relative effects of the average radiance, the proportion of impervious surface and the proportion of intensive agriculture.

Results

For all species, ALAN had a stronger negative effect than impervious surface at the 4 landscape scales tested. This effect was weaker than the effect of intensive agriculture. The negative effect of ALAN was significant for P. pipistrellus, P. kuhlii and E. serotinus, but not for N. leisleri. The effect of impervious surface varied among species while intensive agriculture had a significant negative effect on the 4 species.

Conclusion

Our results highlight the need to consider the impacts of ALAN on biodiversity in land-use planning and suggest that using only impervious surface as a proxy for urbanization may lead to underestimated impacts on biodiversity.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0921-2973 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1697  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tähkämö, L.; Räsänen, R.-S.; Halonen, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Life cycle cost comparison of high-pressure sodium and light-emitting diode luminaires in street lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment Abbreviated Journal Int J Life Cycle Assess  
  Volume 21 Issue 2 Pages 137-145  
  Keywords Economics; Lighting  
  Abstract Purpose

Cities and municipalities are facing a great challenge in 2015 when the widely used high-pressure mercury lamps are banned from the European Union market. This results to approximately 18 million lamps to be changed to other light source technologies suitable for outdoor lighting. The most probable replacement technologies are high-pressure sodium and light-emitting diode luminaires. The article provides economic information for the cities and municipalities to use when making the decision on the choice of technology.

Methods

A life cycle cost analysis was conducted for the high-pressure sodium and light-emitting diode luminaires including the investment costs, operating costs and residual value over 30-year time frame. The investment costs included the purchase prices of all parts, freight and installation costs. The operating costs accounted for the energy and maintenance costs, and the residual value was calculated using the 25 % estimate of the initial purchase price. The approach of the calculation considered only the luminaires to be installed; the scope of the study excluded the previous installations, which may contain any light source technology or be inexistent. The analysis excluded the poles, wiring and other infrastructure. A sensitivity analysis additionally studied six scenarios, in which relevant calculation parameters were changed.

Results and discussion

The life cycle cost analysis of the two road lighting luminaire technologies showed that the HPS luminaire was normally a more economical solution compared to the light-emitting diode (LED) luminaire. The total life cycle costs of the HPS luminaire were 45 % lower than those of the LED luminaire per kilometre. However, the scenarios in the sensitivity analysis indicated that there were circumstances where the cost-efficiency of the LED luminaire was particularly improved. In order for the LED technology to become fully competitive against the HPS technology, several scenarios have to take place simultaneously. The life cycle costs of the LED luminaire were reduced compared to the HPS luminaire by increased electricity price, exclusion of spot replacements, reduced purchase price and modularity of the LED luminaire.

Conclusions

Despite the greater luminous efficacy, the LED luminaire was found to have greater life cycle costs compared to the HPS luminaire. However, the LED technology is expected to become more economical in the future due to the development in luminous efficacy, improved product quality, reduction in the purchase price and the enhanced competition in the LED segment. Despite the unfavourable cost structure, the LED technology offers other benefits, such as lighting controls and colour characteristics.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0948-3349 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1725  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, D.; Zhao, X.; Li, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Remote sensing of human beings – a perspective from nighttime light Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Geo-spatial Information Science Abbreviated Journal Geo-spatial Information Science  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 69-79  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract City lights, fishing boats, and oil fields are the major sources of nighttime lights, therefore the nighttime light images provide a unique source to map human beings and their activities from outer space. While most of the scholars focused on application of nighttime light remote sensing in urbanization and regional development, the actual fields are much wider. This paper summarized the applications of nighttime light remote sensing into fields such as the estimation of socioeconomic parameters, monitoring urbanization, evaluation of important events, analyzing light pollution, fishery, etc. For estimation of socioeconomic parameters, the most promising progress is that Gross Domestic Product and its growth rate have been estimated with statistical data and nighttime light data using econometric models. For monitoring urbanization, urban area and its dynamics can be extracted using different classification methods, and spatial analysis has been employed to map urban agglomeration. As sharp changes of nighttime light are associated with important socioeconomic events, the images have been used to evaluate humanitarian disasters, especially in the current Syrian and Iraqi wars. Light pollution is another hotspot of nighttime light application, as the night light is related to some diseases and abnormal behavior of animals, and the nighttime light images can provide light pollution information on large scales so that it is much easier to analyze the effects of light pollutions. In each field, we listed typical cases of the applications. At last, future studies of nighttime light remote sensing have been predicted.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1009-5020 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1878  
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Author Horrace, W.C.; Rohlin, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How Dark Is Dark? Bright Lights, Big City, Racial Profiling Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Review of Economics and Statistics Abbreviated Journal Review of Economics and Statistics  
  Volume 98 Issue 2 Pages 226-232  
  Keywords Psychology; Public Safety; Society  
  Abstract Grogger and Ridgeway (2006) use the daylight saving time shift to develop a police racial profiling test that is based on differences in driver race visibility and (hence) the race distribution of traffic stops across daylight and darkness. However, urban environments may be well lit at night, eroding the power of their test. We refine their test using streetlight location data in Syracuse, New York, and the results change in the direction of finding profiling of black drivers. Our preferred specification suggests that the odds of a black driver being stopped (relative to nonblack drivers) increase 15% in daylight compared to darkness.  
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  Language (up) Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-6535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2167  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rossi, F.; Bonamente, E.; Nicolini, A.; Anderini, E.; Cotana, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A carbon footprint and energy consumption assessment methodology for UHI-affected lighting systems in built areas Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Energy and Buildings Abbreviated Journal Energy and Buildings  
  Volume 114 Issue Pages 96-103  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Energy  
  Abstract This paper investigates the effects of urban heat island (UHI) on outdoor lighting systems in terms of GHG emissions: a novel methodology is proposed to assess the carbon footprint (CF) change of lighting services in built areas caused by UHI-induced ΔT with particular focus on the evaluation of the energy consumption. The methodology can be applied also to other activities affected by the UHI, such as HVAC and transport systems. In particular, ΔCF was introduced by a two-fold approach: the quantification of the CF change due to UHI (as difference between CF in an UHI-affected case and CF for an UHI-less case) and the CF change produced by a 1 °C temperature change. A focus on LED lamps was developed: the lifetime of LEDs exponentially decreases with increasing temperature and the luminous flux exponentially decays with operation time. UHI (i.e. the increase in ambient temperature) affects the lifetime and the luminous flux of lamps producing higher energy consumption and higher replacement rates. Results showed that a positive ΔT due to UHI produces a positive ΔCF, which also becomes economically relevant in long-term scenarios. A case study was analyzed by applying the proposed methodology to Rome outdoor public lighting.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0378-7788 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2483  
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