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Author Fallows, C.; Fallows, M.; Hammerschlag, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of lunar phase on predator-prey interactions between white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) and Cape fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Environmental Biology of Fishes Abbreviated Journal Environ Biol Fish  
  Volume 99 Issue 11 Pages 805-812  
  Keywords Moonlight; Animals  
  Abstract Predator-prey relationships can be influenced by environmental conditions, including changes in moon phase and associated lunar illumination. Two primary hypotheses have been proposed underlying the effects of moonlight on predator-prey interactions: the predation risk hypothesis and visual acuity hypothesis. However, few studies have tested these hypotheses during twilight hours or involved large mobile aquatic species. In the present study, we evaluated these hypotheses using data collected over 16 years on predator-prey interactions between white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) and Cape fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus) at sunrise. Data from 1476 natural predation events demonstrated shark attack frequency and seal capture success was significantly higher at sunrise during periods of low (0–10 %) versus high (90–100 %) lunar illumination, which is consistent with the visual acuity hypothesis. We propose that during full moon periods, white sharks at night are at a visual and tactical advantage over seals which are silhouetted at the surface in the moonlight and thus easier to isolate in darkness, while sharks remain camouflaged hunting from below through deep water. However, at sunrise, we hypothesize this advantage shifts to seals as the added lunar illumination, combined with emerging sunlight, may decrease shark stealth and increase the ability of seals to detect and avoid sharks. These finding suggest that lunar effects on predator-prey dynamics can be context specific, likely moderated by visual acuity of predators and prey which may change according to the photoperiod.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language (up) Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0378-1909 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3141  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gómez, C.; Mitchell, C.A. url  openurl
  Title Physiological and Productivity Responses of High-wire Tomato as Affected by Supplemental Light Source and Distribution within the Canopy Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science Abbreviated Journal J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci.  
  Volume 141 Issue 2 Pages 196-208  
  Keywords Plants; tomato; LED; LED lighting; Solanum lycopersicum; intracanopy lighting; greenhouses; intracanopy supplemental lighting; daily light integral  
  Abstract The relative coolness-to-touch of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has enabled commercial implementation of intracanopy lighting (ICL) in the greenhouse. Intracanopy lighting, which refers to the strategy of lighting along the side or from within the foliar canopy, can increase canopy photosynthetic activity, but physiological and productivity responses of high-wire greenhouse tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to intracanopy supplemental lighting (SL) still are not yet fully understood. Two consecutive production experiments were conducted across seasons in a glass-glazed greenhouse located in a midnorthern, continental climate [lat. 40°N (West Lafayette, IN)]. Plants were grown from winter-to-summer [increasing solar daily light integral (DLI)] and from summer-to-winter (decreasing solar DLI) to compare three SL strategies for high-wire tomato production across changing solar DLIs: top lighting with high-pressure sodium lamps (HPS) vs. intracanopy LED vertical towers vs. hybrid SL (HPS + horizontal ICL-LEDs). A control treatment also was included for which no SL was provided. Supplemental DLI for each experimental period was adjusted monthly, to complement seasonal changes in sunlight, aiming to approach a target total DLI of 25 mol·m‒2·d‒1 during fruit set. Harvest parameters (total fruit fresh weight, number of fruit harvested, and average cluster fresh weight), tissue temperature, chlorophyll fluorescence, and stomatal conductance (gS) were unaffected by SL treatment in both experiments. Among the physiological parameters evaluated, CO2 assimilation measured under light-saturating conditions, light-limited quantum-use efficiency, and maximum gross CO2 assimilation (Amax) proved to be good indicators of how ICL reduces the top-to-bottom decline in leaf photosynthetic activity otherwise measured with top lighting only (HPS-SL or solar). Although SL generally increased fruit yield relative to control, lack of SL treatment differences among harvest parameters indicates that higher crop photosynthetic activity did not increase fruit yield. Compared with control, intracanopy SL increased yield to the same extent as top SL, but the remaining photoassimilate from ICL most likely was partitioned to maintain nonharvested, vegetative plant parts as well.  
  Address Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, 625 Agriculture Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2010  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher American Society for Horticultural Science Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) Engligh Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-1062 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1431  
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Author Labuda, M., Pavličková, K., Števová, J. url  openurl
  Title Dark Sky Parks – new impulse for nature tourism development in protected areas (National Park Muranska Planina, Slovakia) Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication e-Review of Tourism Research Abbreviated Journal eRTR  
  Volume 13 Issue 5/6 Pages 536-549  
  Keywords Society; tourism; astrotourism; sustainable tourism; dark sky parks  
  Abstract Dark Sky Parks are one of important measures to support nature tourism in the protected

areas. In this paper, we introduce the concept of astro-tourism on the model area of National Park Muranska Planina (Slovakia), which should lead to the establishment of Dark Sky Park and the implementation of measures focused on dark sky protection, i.e. the elimination of light pollution over model area. The concept includes the measurement of night sky brightness, the selection of suitable observational sites and lighting plan. It is very important from the view of ecology, e.g. by the protection of night animal species. On the other hand, these characteristics can be fully used in new tourism concept in that protected area.
 
  Address Department of Landscape Ecology, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia; mlabuda(at)fns.uniba.sk,  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2246  
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Author Lima, R.C.; da Cunhac, J.P.; Peixinho, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light Pollution: Assessment of Sky Glow on two Dark Sky Regions of Portugal Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A: Current Issues Abbreviated Journal J Toxicol Environm Health  
  Volume 79 Issue 7 Pages 307-319  
  Keywords Skyglow; Portugal; Peneda-Gerês National Park; Alqueva  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN), producing light pollution (LP), is not a matter restricted to astronomy anymore. Light is part of modern societies and, as a consequence, the natural cycle day–night (bright–dark) has been interrupted in a large segment of the global population. There is increasing evidence that exposure to certain types of light at night and beyond threshold levels may produce hazardous effects to humans and the environment. The concept of “dark skies reserves” is a step forward in order to preserve the night sky and a means of enhancing public awareness of the problem of spread of light pollution worldwide. The aim of this study was to assess the skyglow at two sites in Portugal, the Peneda-Gerês National Park (PNPG) and the region now known as Dark Sky Alqueva Reserve. The latter site was classified as a “Starlight Tourism Destination“ by the Starlight Foundation (the first in the world to achieve this classification) following a series of night sky measurements in situ described herein. The measurements at PNPG also contributed to the new set of regulations concerning light pollution at this national park. This study presents the first in situ systematic measurements of night sky brightness, showing that at the two sites the skies are mostly in levels 3 to 4 of the Bortle 9-level scale (with level 1 being the best achievable). The results indicate that the sources of light pollution and skyglow can be attributed predominantly to contamination from nearby urban regions.  
  Address Physics, School of Allied Health Technologies of the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Portugal;  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1408  
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Author Cheung, I.N.; Zee, P.C.; Shalman, D.; Malkani, R.G.; Kang, J.; Reid, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Morning and Evening Blue-Enriched Light Exposure Alters Metabolic Function in Normal Weight Adults Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 11 Issue 5 Pages e0155601  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Increasing evidence points to associations between light-dark exposure patterns, feeding behavior, and metabolism. This study aimed to determine the acute effects of 3 hours of morning versus evening blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light on hunger, metabolic function, and physiological arousal. Nineteen healthy adults completed this 4-day inpatient protocol under dim light conditions (<20lux). Participants were randomized to 3 hours of blue-enriched light exposure on Day 3 starting either 0.5 hours after wake (n = 9; morning group) or 10.5 hours after wake (n = 10; evening group). All participants remained in dim light on Day 2 to serve as their baseline. Subjective hunger and sleepiness scales were collected hourly. Blood was sampled at 30-minute intervals for 4 hours in association with the light exposure period for glucose, insulin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and area under the curve (AUC) for insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR and cortisol were calculated. Comparisons relative to baseline were done using t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs. In both the morning and evening groups, insulin total area, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-IR AUC were increased and subjective sleepiness was reduced with blue-enriched light compared to dim light. The evening group, but not the morning group, had significantly higher glucose peak value during blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light. There were no other significant differences between the morning or the evening groups in response to blue-enriched light exposure. Blue-enriched light exposure acutely alters glucose metabolism and sleepiness, however the mechanisms behind this relationship and its impacts on hunger and appetite regulation remain unclear. These results provide further support for a role of environmental light exposure in the regulation of metabolism.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language (up) English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27191727 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1457  
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