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Author Quiles, C.L.; de Oliveira, M.A.B.; Tonon, A.C.; Hidalgo, M.P.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Biological adaptability under seasonal variation of light/dark cycles Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages 964-971  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract 3A substantial amount of experimental models designed to understand rhythms entrainment and the effects of different regimens of light exposure on health have been proposed. However, many of them do not relate to what occurs in real life. Our objective was to evaluate the influence of “seasonal-like” variation in light/dark cycles on biological rhythms. Twenty adult male Wistar rats were assigned to three groups: control (CT), kept in 12:12 light/dark (LD) cycle; long photoperiod/short photoperiod (LP/SP), kept in 16.5:7.5 LD cycle for 18 days (phase A), then 17 days of gradual reductions in light time (phase B), then 18 days of shorter exposure (7.5:16.5 LD cycle, phase C); short photoperiod/long photoperiod (SP/LP) group, with same modifications as the LP/SP group, but in reverse order, starting phase A in 7.5:16.5 LD cycle. Activity and temperature were recorded constantly, and melatonin and cortisol concentrations were measured twice. Activity and temperature acrophases of all groups changed according to light. The correlation between activity and temperature was, overall, significantly lower for SP/LP group compared with LP/SP and CT groups. Regarding melatonin concentration, LP/SP group showed significant positive correlation between phase A and C (p = 0.018). Animals changed temperature and activity according to photoperiod and demonstrated better adaptability in transitioning from long to short photoperiod. Since this model imitates seasonal variation in light in a species that is largely used in behavioral experiments, it reveals promising methods to improve the reliability of experimental models and of further environmental health research.  
  Address b Pos-graduacao em Psiquiatria e Ciencias do Comportamento, Faculdade de Medicina (FAMED) , Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS) , Porto Alegre , Brasil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:27222076 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1512  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Phelps, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A powerful non-pharmacologic treatment for mania – virtually Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Bipolar Disorders Abbreviated Journal Bipolar Disord  
  Volume 18 Issue 4 Pages 379-382  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address Samaritan Mental Health, Corvallis, OR, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1398-5647 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:27218661 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1511  
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Author Cheung, I.N.; Zee, P.C.; Shalman, D.; Malkani, R.G.; Kang, J.; Reid, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Morning and Evening Blue-Enriched Light Exposure Alters Metabolic Function in Normal Weight Adults Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 11 Issue 5 Pages e0155601  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Increasing evidence points to associations between light-dark exposure patterns, feeding behavior, and metabolism. This study aimed to determine the acute effects of 3 hours of morning versus evening blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light on hunger, metabolic function, and physiological arousal. Nineteen healthy adults completed this 4-day inpatient protocol under dim light conditions (<20lux). Participants were randomized to 3 hours of blue-enriched light exposure on Day 3 starting either 0.5 hours after wake (n = 9; morning group) or 10.5 hours after wake (n = 10; evening group). All participants remained in dim light on Day 2 to serve as their baseline. Subjective hunger and sleepiness scales were collected hourly. Blood was sampled at 30-minute intervals for 4 hours in association with the light exposure period for glucose, insulin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and area under the curve (AUC) for insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR and cortisol were calculated. Comparisons relative to baseline were done using t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs. In both the morning and evening groups, insulin total area, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-IR AUC were increased and subjective sleepiness was reduced with blue-enriched light compared to dim light. The evening group, but not the morning group, had significantly higher glucose peak value during blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light. There were no other significant differences between the morning or the evening groups in response to blue-enriched light exposure. Blue-enriched light exposure acutely alters glucose metabolism and sleepiness, however the mechanisms behind this relationship and its impacts on hunger and appetite regulation remain unclear. These results provide further support for a role of environmental light exposure in the regulation of metabolism.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:27191727 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1457  
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Author Raap, T.; Pinxten, R.; Eens, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night disrupts sleep in female great tits (Parus major) during the nestling period, and is followed by a sleep rebound Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut  
  Volume 215 Issue Pages 125-134  
  Keywords Biology  
  Abstract Artificial light at night has been linked to a wide variety of physiological and behavioural consequences in humans and animals. Given that little is known about the impact of light pollution on sleep in wild animals, we tested how experimentally elevated light levels affected sleep behaviour of female songbirds rearing 10 day old chicks. Using a within-subject design, individual sleep behaviour was observed over three consecutive nights in great tits (Parus major), with females sleeping in a natural dark situation on the first and third night, whereas on the second night they were exposed to a light-emitting diode (1.6 lux). Artificial light in the nest box dramatically and significantly affected sleep behaviour, causing females to fall asleep later (95 min; while entry time was unaffected), wake up earlier (74 min) and sleep less (56%). Females spent a greater proportion of the night awake and the frequency of their sleep bouts decreased, while the length of their sleep bouts remained equal. Artificial light also increased begging of chicks at night, which may have contributed to the sleep disruption in females or vice versa. The night following the light treatment, females slept 25% more compared to the first night, which was mainly achieved by increasing the frequency of sleep bouts. Although there was a consistent pattern in how artificial light affected sleep, there was also large among-individual variation in how strongly females were affected. When comparing current results with a similar experiment during winter, our results highlight differences in effects between seasons and underscore the importance of studying light pollution during different seasons. Our study shows that light pollution may have a significant impact on sleep behaviour in free-living animals during the reproductive season, which may provide a potential mechanism by which artificial light affects fitness.  
  Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology & Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610, Wilrijk, Belgium  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:27179331 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1451  
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Author Farkas, A.; Szaz, D.; Egri, A.; Barta, A.; Meszaros, A.; Hegedus, R.; Horvath, G.; Kriska, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mayflies are least attracted to vertical polarization: A polarotactic reaction helping to avoid unsuitable habitats Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume 163 Issue Pages 219-227  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Like other aquatic insects, mayflies are positively polarotactic and locate water surfaces by means of the horizontal polarization of water-reflected light. However, may vertically polarized light also have implications for the swarming behaviour of mayflies? To answer this question, we studied in four field experiments the behavioural responses of Ephoron virgo and Caenis robusta mayflies to lamps emitting horizontally and vertically polarized and unpolarized light. In both species, unpolarized light induces positive phototaxis, horizontally polarized light elicits positive photo- and polarotaxis, horizontally polarized light is much more attractive than unpolarized light, and vertically polarized light is the least attractive if the stimulus intensities and spectra are the same. Vertically polarized light was the most attractive for C. robusta if its intensity was about two and five times higher than that of the unpolarized and horizontally polarized stimuli, respectively. We suggest that the mayfly behaviour observed in our experiments may facilitate the stability of swarming above water surfaces. Beside the open water surface reflecting horizontally polarized light, the shadow and mirror image of riparian vegetation at the edge of the water surface reflect weakly and non-horizontally (mainly vertically) polarized light. Due to their positive polarotaxis, flying mayflies remain continuously above the water surface, because they keep away from the unpolarized or non-horizontally polarizing edge regions (water surface and coast line) of water bodies. We also discuss how our findings can explain the regulation of mayfly colonization.  
  Address Danube Research Institute, MTA Centre for Ecological Research, H-1113 Budapest, Karolina ut 29-31, Hungary; Group for Methodology in Biology Teaching, Biological Institute, Eotvos University, H-1117 Budapest, Pazmany setany 1, Hungary. Electronic address: kriska@ludens.elte.hu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (down) PMID:27178399 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1501  
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