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Author Meng, F.; Chen, D.; Xiong, W.; Tan, H.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, W.; Su, S.-J.
Title Tuning color-correlated temperature and color rendering index of phosphorescent white polymer light-emitting diodes: Towards healthy solid-state lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Organic Electronics Abbreviated Journal Organic Electronics
Volume 34 Issue Pages 18-22
Keywords Lighting
Abstract We report on efficient solution-processed phosphorescent white polymer light-emitting diodes (WPLEDs) with tunable color-correlated temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI), through rationally controlling the composition of the emission layer (EML) based on a near-infrared (NIR)-emitting dinuclear cyclometalated platinum (II) complex bridged with NˆS anionic ligand, named (niq)2Pt2(μ-C8PhOXT)2 (Pt-1, in which PhOXT is 5-(phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole)-2-thiol, niq is 1-naphthylisoquinolinato), a sky-blue emitter iridium (III) bis[(4,6-di-fluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2] (picolinate) (FIrpic), and a yellow emitter bis[2-(thieno[3,2-c]pyridin-4-yl)phenyl]iridium(III)(acetylacetonato) (PO-01). One of the best three-color WPLEDs shows a CCT of 3246 K as well as an excellent high CRI of 87, which are greatly beneficial in reducing deep-blue light damage and simultaneously meet the requirement for good color reproduction. Meanwhile, the relevant WPLED also achieves a maximum current efficiency of 12.1 cd/A, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 10.6%. This work presents an effective approach through rational combination of sky-blue, yellow, and NIR emitters towards high-performance solution-processable WPLEDs with a physiologically-friendly CCT and a high CRI.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1566-1199 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1416
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Author Warrant, E.
Title Superior vision in nocturnal insects inspires new night vision technologies Type Newspaper Article
Year 2016 Publication SPIE Newsroom Abbreviated Journal SPIE Newsroom
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Vision; Animals; Instrumentation
Abstract Algorithms that dramatically improve the quality of video sequences captured in very dim light have been developed on the basis of the neural mechanisms in nocturnal insects with excellent visual capabilities.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1818-2259 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1418
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Author Justice, M.J.; Justice, T.C.
Title Attraction of Insects to Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent, Halogen, and Led Lamps in a Light Trap: Implications for Light Pollution and Urban Ecologies Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Entomological News Abbreviated Journal Entomological News
Volume 125 Issue 5 Pages 315-326
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract The widespread use of electric lamps has created “ecological light pollution” and “artificial light ecology.” Given the important role of insects in ecosystems, how they are affected by light pollution deserves attention. Lamps designed for lighting small areas around residences are used in abundance, but studies specifically examining them are scarce. This study used a light trap to capture insects for 60 summer nights in a suburban town in Virginia, USA. During each night of trapping, one of five different light bulbs was used in the trap (incandescent, compact fluorescent, halogen, warm color temperature LED, or cool color temperature LED). The data suggest that fewer insects overall are attracted to bulbs using LED technology than bulbs using incandescent technology. This difference was also observed in the orders Lepidoptera and Diptera. These results support the use of LED bulbs to reduce the insect attraction and mortality caused by the use of artificial lights at night.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0013-872X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1419
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Author Rund, S.; O'Donnell, A.; Gentile, J.; Reece, S.
Title Daily Rhythms in Mosquitoes and Their Consequences for Malaria Transmission Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Insects Abbreviated Journal Insects
Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 14
Keywords Animals; Human Health
Abstract The 24-h day involves cycles in environmental factors that impact organismal fitness. This is thought to select for organisms to regulate their temporal biology accordingly, through circadian and diel rhythms. In addition to rhythms in abiotic factors (such as light and temperature), biotic factors, including ecological interactions, also follow daily cycles. How daily rhythms shape, and are shaped by, interactions between organisms is poorly understood. Here, we review an emerging area, namely the causes and consequences of daily rhythms in the interactions between vectors, their hosts and the parasites they transmit. We focus on mosquitoes, malaria parasites and vertebrate hosts, because this system offers the opportunity to integrate from genetic and molecular mechanisms to population dynamics and because disrupting rhythms offers a novel avenue for disease control.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2075-4450 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1421
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Author Watson, M.J.; Wilson, D.R.; Mennill, D.J.
Title Anthropogenic light is associated with increased vocal activity by nocturnally migrating birds Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication The Condor Abbreviated Journal The Condor
Volume 118 Issue 2 Pages 338-344
Keywords Animals
Abstract Anthropogenic modifications to the natural environment have profound effects on wild animals, through structural changes to natural ecosystems as well as anthropogenic disturbances such as light and noise. For animals that migrate nocturnally, anthropogenic light can interfere with migration routes, flight altitudes, and social activities that accompany migration, such as acoustic communication. We investigated the effect of anthropogenic light on nocturnal migration of birds through the Great Lakes ecosystem. Specifically, we recorded the vocal activity of migrating birds and compared the number of nocturnal flight calls produced above rural areas with ground-level artificial lights compared to nearby areas without lights. We show that more nocturnal flight calls are detected over artificially lit areas. The median number of nocturnal flight calls recorded at sites with artificial lights (31 per night, interquartile range: 15–135) was 3 times higher than at nearby sites without artificial lights (11 per night, interquartile range: 4–39). By contrast, the number of species detected at lit and unlit sites did not differ significantly (artificially lit sites: 6.5 per night, interquartile range: 5.0–8.8; unlit sites: 4.5 per night, interquartile range: 2.0–7.0). We conclude that artificial lighting changes the behavior of nocturnally migrating birds. The increased detections could be a result of ground-level light sources altering bird behavior during migration. For example, birds might have changed their migratory route to pass over lit areas, flown at lower altitudes over lit areas, increased their calling rate over lit areas, or remained longer over lit areas. Our results for ground-level lights correspond to previous findings demonstrating that migratory birds are influenced by lights on tall structures.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0010-5422 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1422
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