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Author Meng, F.; Chen, D.; Xiong, W.; Tan, H.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, W.; Su, S.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Tuning color-correlated temperature and color rendering index of phosphorescent white polymer light-emitting diodes: Towards healthy solid-state lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Organic Electronics Abbreviated Journal Organic Electronics  
  Volume 34 Issue Pages 18-22  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract We report on efficient solution-processed phosphorescent white polymer light-emitting diodes (WPLEDs) with tunable color-correlated temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI), through rationally controlling the composition of the emission layer (EML) based on a near-infrared (NIR)-emitting dinuclear cyclometalated platinum (II) complex bridged with NˆS anionic ligand, named (niq)2Pt2(μ-C8PhOXT)2 (Pt-1, in which PhOXT is 5-(phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole)-2-thiol, niq is 1-naphthylisoquinolinato), a sky-blue emitter iridium (III) bis[(4,6-di-fluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2] (picolinate) (FIrpic), and a yellow emitter bis[2-(thieno[3,2-c]pyridin-4-yl)phenyl]iridium(III)(acetylacetonato) (PO-01). One of the best three-color WPLEDs shows a CCT of 3246 K as well as an excellent high CRI of 87, which are greatly beneficial in reducing deep-blue light damage and simultaneously meet the requirement for good color reproduction. Meanwhile, the relevant WPLED also achieves a maximum current efficiency of 12.1 cd/A, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 10.6%. This work presents an effective approach through rational combination of sky-blue, yellow, and NIR emitters towards high-performance solution-processable WPLEDs with a physiologically-friendly CCT and a high CRI.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1566-1199 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1416  
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Author Warrant, E.; Dacke, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Visual Navigation in Nocturnal Insects Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Physiology (Bethesda, Md.) Abbreviated Journal Physiology (Bethesda)  
  Volume 31 Issue 3 Pages 182-192  
  Keywords Vision; Animals  
  Abstract Despite their tiny eyes and brains, nocturnal insects have evolved a remarkable capacity to visually navigate at night. Whereas some use moonlight or the stars as celestial compass cues to maintain a straight-line course, others use visual landmarks to navigate to and from their nest. These impressive abilities rely on highly sensitive compound eyes and specialized visual processing strategies in the brain.  
  Address Department of Biology, Lund Vision Group, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1548-9221 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27053732 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1417  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Warrant, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Superior vision in nocturnal insects inspires new night vision technologies Type Newspaper Article
  Year 2016 Publication SPIE Newsroom Abbreviated Journal SPIE Newsroom  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Vision; Animals; Instrumentation  
  Abstract Algorithms that dramatically improve the quality of video sequences captured in very dim light have been developed on the basis of the neural mechanisms in nocturnal insects with excellent visual capabilities.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1818-2259 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1418  
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Author Justice, M.J.; Justice, T.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Attraction of Insects to Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent, Halogen, and Led Lamps in a Light Trap: Implications for Light Pollution and Urban Ecologies Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Entomological News Abbreviated Journal Entomological News  
  Volume 125 Issue 5 Pages 315-326  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract The widespread use of electric lamps has created “ecological light pollution” and “artificial light ecology.” Given the important role of insects in ecosystems, how they are affected by light pollution deserves attention. Lamps designed for lighting small areas around residences are used in abundance, but studies specifically examining them are scarce. This study used a light trap to capture insects for 60 summer nights in a suburban town in Virginia, USA. During each night of trapping, one of five different light bulbs was used in the trap (incandescent, compact fluorescent, halogen, warm color temperature LED, or cool color temperature LED). The data suggest that fewer insects overall are attracted to bulbs using LED technology than bulbs using incandescent technology. This difference was also observed in the orders Lepidoptera and Diptera. These results support the use of LED bulbs to reduce the insect attraction and mortality caused by the use of artificial lights at night.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-872X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1419  
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Author Altermatt, F.; Ebert, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reduced flight-to-light behaviour of moth populations exposed to long-term urban light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Biology Letters Abbreviated Journal Biol Lett  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages 20160111  
  Keywords Lepidoptera; Yponomeuta; adaptation; environmental change; natural selection  
  Abstract The globally increasing light pollution is a well-recognized threat to ecosystems, with negative effects on human, animal and plant wellbeing. The most well-known and widely documented consequence of light pollution is the generally fatal attraction of nocturnal insects to artificial light sources. However, the evolutionary consequences are unknown. Here we report that moth populations from urban areas with high, globally relevant levels of light pollution over several decades show a significantly reduced flight-to-light behaviour compared with populations of the same species from pristine dark-sky habitats. Using a common garden setting, we reared moths from 10 different populations from early-instar larvae and experimentally compared their flight-to-light behaviour under standardized conditions. Moths from urban populations had a significant reduction in the flight-to-light behaviour compared with pristine populations. The reduced attraction to light sources of 'city moths' may directly increase these individuals' survival and reproduction. We anticipate that it comes with a reduced mobility, which negatively affects foraging as well as colonization ability. As nocturnal insects are of eminent significance as pollinators and the primary food source of many vertebrates, an evolutionary change of the flight-to-light behaviour thereby potentially cascades across species interaction networks.  
  Address Department of Environmental Sciences, Zoology, University of Basel, Vesalgasse 1, 4051 Basel, Switzerland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27072407 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1420  
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