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Author Ciriminna, R.; Meneguzzo, F.; Albanese, L.; Pagliaro, M.
Title Solar street lighting: a key technology en route to sustainability: Solar street lighting technology for sustainability Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (down) Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Energy and Environment Abbreviated Journal WIREs Energy Environ
Volume 6 Issue 2 Pages in press
Keywords Lighting, Energy
Abstract Today’s solar street LED lights are able to provide reliable, quality lighting both in developing and developed countries, thereby reducing light poverty and the economic and environmental costs of electric outdoor lighting. Rapid technical innovation and dramatic price reduction in the LED, PV module, and battery components, which has occurred in the last 5 years, will accelerate the penetration of solar street LED lights across the world. Applications will not be limited to countries with significant insolation only but will extend to Northern regions as well. This study provides a critical overview of a technology that will play an important role en route to global sustainability.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2041-8396 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1487
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Author Robertson, K.; Booth, D.T.; Limpus, C.J.
Title An assessment of 'turtle-friendly' lights on the sea-finding behaviour of loggerhead turtle hatchlings (Caretta caretta) Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (down) Wildlife Research Abbreviated Journal Wildl. Res.
Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 27
Keywords Animals
Abstract Context: It is well established that artificial light can disrupt the sea-finding ability of sea turtle hatchlings, and some manufactures are now marketing ‘turtle-friendly’ lights that are supposed to be minimally disruptive to this sea-finding behaviour. However, there have been no studies that have tested whether ‘turtle-friendly’ lights are benign to hatchling sea turtle sea-finding ability.

Aims: We tested two different types of ‘turtle-friendly’ lights (LED amber-light peak intensity 620 nm and LED red-light peak intensity 640 nm) to see whether they are disruptive to the sea-finding ability of eastern-coast Australian loggerhead turtle hatchlings.

Methods: Using standard circular-arena experiments, we assessed the directional preference of newly emerged loggerhead turtle hatchlings from the Woongarra Coast of Queensland, Australia, during different moon phases without artificial lighting and in the presence of ‘turtle-friendly’ lights.

Key results: Contrary to expectations, sea-finding ability of hatchlings was disrupted by the amber lights, particularly in the absence of a moon. The less intense red lights were less disruptive to hatchlings; however, misorientation and disorientation events still occurred when lights were within 4 m of hatchlings. The disruptive impact on sea-finding ability increased with the cumulative impact of multiple lights increasing light intensity.

Conclusions: The ‘turtle-friendly’ lights we used disrupted the sea-finding ability of eastern-coast Australian loggerhead turtle hatchlings, with the most pronounced disruption occurring under moonless conditions.

Implications: The use of amber and red LED lights adjacent to the nesting beaches of loggerhead sea turtles should be managed because this lighting has the potential to disrupt the sea-finding ability of sea turtle hatchlings.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1035-3712 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1413
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Author Foster, J.G.; Algera, D.A.; Brownscombe, J.W.; Zolderdo, A.J.; Cooke, S.J.
Title Consequences of Different Types of Littoral Zone Light Pollution on the Parental Care Behaviour of a Freshwater Teleost Fish Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (down) Water, Air, & Soil Pollution Abbreviated Journal Water Air Soil Pollut
Volume 227 Issue 11 Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Ecological light pollution occurs when artificial lights disrupt the natural regimes of individual organisms or their ecosystems. Increasing development of shoreline habitats leads to increased light pollution (e.g., from cottages, docks, automobile traffic), which could impact the ecology of littoral zones of lakes and rivers. Smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) engage in sole paternal care, guarding their nest continually, day and night, to protect their developing offspring. Any alterations to their behaviour—either directly because of the response to light or indirectly due to changes in nest predator activity and associated response of the bass—could lead to increased energetic demands for fish that have a fixed energy budget and ultimately reduce reproductive success. To examine this issue, tri-axial accelerometer biologgers were externally attached to nesting smallmouth bass during the egg stage to determine whether light pollution (i.e., dock lights with low levels of continuous light and spotlights with high intensity irregular light simulating automobile traffic) altered behaviour of nesting males relative to control fish. Our study revealed that both types of light pollution increased overall bass activity level compared with the control group. The intermittent light treatment group had the highest activity and exhibited large fluctuations between night and day activity levels. Fish in the continual light treatment group displayed statistically higher activity than the control fish but showed limited fluctuations between day and night activity levels. Our results suggest that continuous or intermittent light sources, common in shoreline habitats that have been developed, have the potential to alter the behaviour and thus energy use of nest-guarding fish. This study contributes to the growing body of literature on the ecological consequences of light pollution in aquatic ecosystems.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0049-6979 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1545
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Author Qian, J.; Scheer, F.A.J.L.
Title Circadian System and Glucose Metabolism: Implications for Physiology and Disease Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (down) Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism: TEM Abbreviated Journal Trends Endocrinol Metab
Volume 27 Issue 5 Pages 282-293
Keywords Human Health; circadian rhythms; food timing; glucose metabolism; melatonin; sleep; type 2 diabetes
Abstract The circadian system serves one of the most fundamental properties present in nearly all organisms: it generates 24-h rhythms in behavioral and physiological processes and enables anticipating and adapting to daily environmental changes. Recent studies indicate that the circadian system is important in regulating the daily rhythm in glucose metabolism. Disturbance of this circadian control or of its coordination relative to the environmental/behavioral cycle, such as in shift work, eating late, or due to genetic changes, results in disturbed glucose control and increased type 2 diabetes risk. Therefore, an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms underlying glucose regulation by the circadian system and its disturbance may help in the development of therapeutic interventions against the deleterious health consequences of circadian disruption.
Address Medical Chronobiology Program, Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; fscheer(at)bwh.harvard.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Cell Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1043-2760 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27079518; PMCID:PMC4842150 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1446
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Author Aulsebrook, A.E.; Jones, T.M.; Rattenborg, N.C.; Roth, T.C. 2nd; Lesku, J.A.
Title Sleep Ecophysiology: Integrating Neuroscience and Ecology Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (down) Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends Ecol Evol
Volume 31 Issue 8 Pages 590-599
Keywords Commentary; Physiology
Abstract Here, we propose an original approach to explain one of the great unresolved questions in animal biology: what is the function of sleep? Existing ecological and neurological approaches to this question have become roadblocks to an answer. Ecologists typically treat sleep as a simple behavior, instead of a heterogeneous neurophysiological state, while neuroscientists generally fail to appreciate the critical insights offered by the consideration of ecology and evolutionary history. Redressing these shortfalls requires cross-disciplinary integration. By bringing together aspects of behavioral ecology, evolution, and conservation with neurophysiology, we can achieve a more comprehensive understanding of sleep, including its implications for adaptive waking behavior and fitness.
Address La Trobe University, School of Life Sciences, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: j.lesku@latrobe.edu.au
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27262386 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1462
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