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Author Esaki, Y.; Kitajima, T.; Ito, Y.; Koike, S.; Nakao, Y.; Tsuchiya, A.; Hirose, M.; Iwata, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Wearing blue light-blocking glasses in the evening advances circadian rhythms in the patients with delayed sleep phase disorder: An open-label trial Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages 1037-1044  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract It has been recently discovered that blue wavelengths form the portion of the visible electromagnetic spectrum that most potently regulates circadian rhythm. We investigated the effect of blue light-blocking glasses in subjects with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). This open-label trial was conducted over 4 consecutive weeks. The DSPD patients were instructed to wear blue light-blocking amber glasses from 21:00 p.m. to bedtime, every evening for 2 weeks. To ascertain the outcome of this intervention, we measured dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) and actigraphic sleep data at baseline and after the treatment. Nine consecutive DSPD patients participated in this study. Most subjects could complete the treatment with the exception of one patient who hoped for changing to drug therapy before the treatment was completed. The patients who used amber lens showed an advance of 78 min in DLMO value, although the change was not statistically significant (p = 0.145). Nevertheless, the sleep onset time measured by actigraph was advanced by 132 min after the treatment (p = 0.034). These data suggest that wearing amber lenses may be an effective and safe intervention for the patients with DSPD. These findings also warrant replication in a larger patient cohort with controlled observations.  
  Address a Department of Psychiatry , Fujita Health University School of Medicine , Aichi , Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27322730 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1488  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Quiles, C.L.; de Oliveira, M.A.B.; Tonon, A.C.; Hidalgo, M.P.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Biological adaptability under seasonal variation of light/dark cycles Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages 964-971  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract 3A substantial amount of experimental models designed to understand rhythms entrainment and the effects of different regimens of light exposure on health have been proposed. However, many of them do not relate to what occurs in real life. Our objective was to evaluate the influence of “seasonal-like” variation in light/dark cycles on biological rhythms. Twenty adult male Wistar rats were assigned to three groups: control (CT), kept in 12:12 light/dark (LD) cycle; long photoperiod/short photoperiod (LP/SP), kept in 16.5:7.5 LD cycle for 18 days (phase A), then 17 days of gradual reductions in light time (phase B), then 18 days of shorter exposure (7.5:16.5 LD cycle, phase C); short photoperiod/long photoperiod (SP/LP) group, with same modifications as the LP/SP group, but in reverse order, starting phase A in 7.5:16.5 LD cycle. Activity and temperature were recorded constantly, and melatonin and cortisol concentrations were measured twice. Activity and temperature acrophases of all groups changed according to light. The correlation between activity and temperature was, overall, significantly lower for SP/LP group compared with LP/SP and CT groups. Regarding melatonin concentration, LP/SP group showed significant positive correlation between phase A and C (p = 0.018). Animals changed temperature and activity according to photoperiod and demonstrated better adaptability in transitioning from long to short photoperiod. Since this model imitates seasonal variation in light in a species that is largely used in behavioral experiments, it reveals promising methods to improve the reliability of experimental models and of further environmental health research.  
  Address b Pos-graduacao em Psiquiatria e Ciencias do Comportamento, Faculdade de Medicina (FAMED) , Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS) , Porto Alegre , Brasil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27222076 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1512  
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Author Canazei, M.; Pohl, W.; Bliem, H.R.; Weiss, E.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acute effects of different light spectra on simulated night-shift work without circadian alignment Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 34 Issue 3 Pages 303-317  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Short-wavelength and short-wavelength-enhanced light have a strong impact on night-time working performance, subjective feelings of alertness and circadian physiology. In the present study, we investigated acute effects of white light sources with varied reduced portions of short wavelengths on cognitive and visual performance, mood and cardiac output.Thirty-one healthy subjects were investigated in a balanced cross-over design under three light spectra in a simulated night-shift paradigm without circadian adaptation.Exposure to the light spectrum with the largest attenuation of short wavelengths reduced heart rate and increased vagal cardiac parameters during the night compared to the other two light spectra without deleterious effects on sustained attention, working memory and subjective alertness. In addition, colour discrimination capability was significantly decreased under this light source.To our knowledge, the present study for the first time demonstrates that polychromatic white light with reduced short wavelengths, fulfilling current lighting standards for indoor illumination, may have a positive impact on cardiac physiology of night-shift workers without detrimental consequences for cognitive performance and alertness.  
  Address c Department of Psychology , University of Graz , Graz , Austria  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27579732 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1519  
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Author Delhey, K.; Peters, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Implications for conservation of anthropogenic impacts on visual communication and camouflage Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication (up) Conservation Biology : the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Biol  
  Volume 31 Issue 1 Pages 30-39  
  Keywords Conservation  
  Abstract Anthropogenic environmental impacts can disrupt the sensory environment of animals and affect important processes from mate choice to predator avoidance. Currently these effects are best understood for auditory and chemo-sensory modalities and recent reviews highlight their importance for conservation. Here we summarise how anthropogenic changes to the visual environment (ambient light, transmission, backgrounds) affect visual communication and camouflage, and highlight implications for conservation. These implications are particularly evident for disrupted camouflage due to its tight links with survival while the conservation importance of impaired visual communication is less well-documented. Such effects can be potentially severe when they affect critical processes such as pollination or species recognition. However, when impaired mate choice does not lead to hybridization, the conservation consequences are less clear. We suggest that the demographic effects of human impacts on visual communication and camouflage will be particularly strong when: (a) human-induced modifications to the visual environment are evolutionary novel, that is, very different from natural variation, (b) affected species and populations have low levels of intraspecific (genotypic and phenotypic) variation and low levels of behavioural, sensory or physiological plasticity and (c) the processes affected are directly related to survival (camouflage), species recognition, or number of offspring produced, rather than offspring quality or attractiveness. The evidence summarized here suggests that anthropogenic effects on the visual environment might be of similar conservation concerns as those on other sensory modalities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address 25 Rainforest Walk, School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, 3800, Clayton, Victoria, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0888-8892 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27604521 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1525  
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Author Last, K. S.; Hobbs, L.; Berge, J.; Brierley, A. S.; Cottier, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Moonlight Drives Ocean-Scale Mass Vertical Migration of Zooplankton during the Arctic Winter Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication (up) Current Biology Abbreviated Journal Current Biology  
  Volume 26 Issue 2 Pages 244-251  
  Keywords animals  
  Abstract In extreme high-latitude marine environments that are without solar illumination in winter, light-mediated patterns of biological migration have historically been considered non-existent [ 1 ]. However, diel vertical migration (DVM) of zooplankton has been shown to occur even during the darkest part of the polar night, when illumination levels are exceptionally low [ 2, 3 ]. This paradox is, as yet, unexplained. Here, we present evidence of an unexpected uniform behavior across the entire Arctic, in fjord, shelf, slope and open sea, where vertical migrations of zooplankton are driven by lunar illumination. A shift from solar-day (24-hr period) to lunar-day (24.8-hr period) vertical migration takes place in winter when the moon rises above the horizon. Further, mass sinking of zooplankton from the surface waters and accumulation at a depth of ∼50 m occurs every 29.5 days in winter, coincident with the periods of full moon. Moonlight may enable predation of zooplankton by carnivorous zooplankters, fish, and birds now known to feed during the polar night [ 4 ]. Although primary production is almost nil at this time, lunar vertical migration (LVM) may facilitate monthly pulses of carbon remineralization, as they occur continuously in illuminated mesopelagic systems [ 5 ], due to community respiration of carnivorous and detritivorous zooplankton. The extent of LVM during the winter suggests that the behavior is highly conserved and adaptive and therefore needs to be considered as “baseline” zooplankton activity in a changing Arctic ocean [ 6–9 ].  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1329  
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