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Author Lagiou, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Shedding light on the role of circadian disruption in breast cancer etiology Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication (up) European Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Epidemiol  
  Volume 31 Issue 9 Pages 807-810  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. pdlagiou@med.uoa.gr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0393-2990 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27550370 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1508  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Contel, T.M.; Ferrandis, I.G.; Ferrandis, X.G. url  openurl
  Title Light pollution in natural science textbooks in Spanish secondary education Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication (up) European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education Abbreviated Journal Eur. J. Sci. Math. Ed.  
  Volume 4 Issue 2 Pages 129-139  
  Keywords Education; Light pollution, Secondary education, Natural science textbooks, Spanish secondary education curriculum  
  Abstract Light pollution has emerged with the industrial development in recent decades. It is becoming a significant environmental issue for cities today and it will probably become more important in the near future. However, very little research has been carried out on this issue in the field of science teaching, despite there being a general agreement that education has an important contribution to make in the protection of the environment. This research analyses this problem in secondary education, through the official curriculum and textbooks published for the Valencian Region (Spain).  We have based the research on the “Content analysis” method. Light pollution, despite being included in the Spanish compulsory secondary education curriculum, is an issue that is barely touched on in the majority of the first and second year Natural Science textbooks analysed.  
  Address Department of Nursing, Research and Health Care Managemen, Ctatholic University of Valencia “San Vicente Martir”, Valencia, Spain; ignacio.garcia‐ferrandis(at)uv.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2301-251X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1433  
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Author Coughlin, M.; Stubbs, C.; Claver, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A daytime measurement of the lunar contribution to the night sky brightness in LSST’s ugrizy bands–initial results Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication (up) Experimental Astronomy Abbreviated Journal Exp Astron  
  Volume 41 Issue 3 Pages 393-408  
  Keywords Moonlight  
  Abstract We report measurements from which we determine the spatial structure ofthe lunar contribution to night sky brightness, taken at the LSST site on Cerro Pachonin Chile. We use an array of six photodiodes with filters that approximate the LargeSynoptic Survey Telescope’su, g, r, i, z,andybands. We use the sun as a proxy forthe moon, and measure sky brightness as a function of zenith angle of the point onsky, zenith angle of the sun, and angular distance between the sun and the point onsky. We make a correction for the difference between the illumination spectrum of thesun and the moon. Since scattered sunlight totally dominates the daytime sky bright-ness, this technique allows us to cleanly determine the contribution to the (cloudless)night sky from backscattered moonlight, without contamination from other sourcesof night sky brightness. We estimate our uncertainty in the relative lunar night skybrightness vs. zenith and lunar angle to be between 0.3–0.7 mags depending on thepassband. This information is useful in planning the optimal execution of the LSSTsurvey, and perhaps for other astronomical observations as well. Although our pri-mary objective is to map out the angular structure and spectrum of the scattered lightfrom the atmosphere and particulates, we also make an estimate of the expected num-ber of scattered lunar photons per pixel per second in LSST, and find values that arein overall agreement with previous estimates.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0922-6435 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3039  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nickla, D.L.; Totonelly, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Brief light exposure at night disrupts the circadian rhythms in eye growth and choroidal thickness in chicks Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication (up) Experimental eye Research Abbreviated Journal Exp Eye Res  
  Volume 146 Issue Pages 189-195  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Changes in ocular growth that lead to myopia or hyperopia are associated with alterations in the circadian rhythms in eye growth, choroidal thickness and intraocular pressure in animal models of emmetropization. Recent studies have shown that light at night has deleterious effects on human health, acting via “circadian disruptions” of various diurnal rhythms, including changes in phase or amplitude. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of brief, 2-hour episodes of light in the middle of the night on the rhythms in axial length and choroidal thickness, and whether these alter eye growth and refractive error in the chick model of myopia. Starting at 2 weeks of age, birds received 2 hours of light between 12:00 am and 2:00 am for 7 days (n=12; total hours of light: 14 hrs). Age-matched controls had a continuous dark night (n=14; 14L/10D). Ocular dimensions were measured using high-frequency A-scan ultrasonography on the first day of the experiment, and again on day 7, at 6-hour intervals, starting at noon (12pm, 6pm, 12am, 6am, 12pm). Measurements during the night were done under a photographic safe-light. These data were used to determine rhythm parameters of phase and amplitude. 2 groups of birds, both experimental (light at night) and control, were measured with ultrasound at various intervals over the course of 4 weeks to determine growth rates. Refractive errors were measured in 6 experimental and 6 control birds at the end of 2 weeks. Eyes of birds in a normal L/D cycle showed sinusoidal 24-hour period diurnal rhythms in axial length and choroid thickness. Light in the middle of the night caused changes in both the rhythms in axial length and choroidal thickness, such that neither could be fit to a sine function having a period of 24 hours. Light caused an acute, transient stimulation in ocular growth rate in the subsequent 6-hour period (12 am to 6 am), that may be responsible for the increased growth rate seen 4 weeks later, and the more myopic refractive error. It also abolished the increase in choroidal thickness that normally occurs between 6 pm and 12 am. We conclude that light at night alters the rhythms in axial length and choroidal thickness in an animal model of eye growth, and that these circadian disruptions might lead to the development of ametropias. These results have implications for the use of light during the night in children.  
  Address The New England College of Optometry, Boston, MA, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0014-4835 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26970497 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1371  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sliney, D.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title What is light? The visible spectrum and beyond Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication (up) Eye (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Eye (Lond)  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; human vision; spectrum; electromagnetic spectrum; visible; *Ultraviolet Rays; light  
  Abstract In this International Year of Light, it is particularly appropriate to review the historical concept of what is light and the controversies surrounding the extent of the visible spectrum. Today we recognize that light possesses both a wave and particle nature. It is also clear that the limits of visibility really extend from about 310 nm in the ultraviolet (in youth) to about 1100 nm in the near-infrared, but depend very much on the radiance, that is, 'brightness' of the light source. The spectral content of artificial lighting are undergoing very significant changes in our lifetime, and the full biological implications of the spectral content of newer lighting technologies remain to be fully explored.  
  Address Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0950-222X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26768917 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1337  
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