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Author Yang, Y.; Yu, Y.; Yang, B.; Zhou, H.; Pan, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Physiological responses to daily light exposure Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages 24808  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Long daylength artificial light exposure associates with disorders, and a potential physiological mechanism has been proposed. However, previous studies have examined no more than three artificial light treatments and limited metabolic parameters, which have been insufficient to demonstrate mechanical responses. Here, comprehensive physiological response curves were established and the physiological mechanism was strengthened. Chicks were illuminated for 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, or 22 h periods each day. A quadratic relationship between abdominal adipose weight (AAW) and light period suggested that long-term or short-term light exposure could decrease the amount of AAW. Quantitative relationships between physiological parameters and daily light period were also established in this study. The relationships between triglycerides (TG), cholesterol (TC), glucose (GLU), phosphorus (P) levels and daily light period could be described by quadratic regression models. TG levels, AAW, and BW positively correlated with each other, suggesting long-term light exposure significantly increased AAW by increasing TG thus resulting in greater BW. A positive correlation between blood triiodothyronine (T3) levels and BW suggested that daily long-term light exposure increased BW by thyroid hormone secretion. Though the molecular pathway remains unknown, these results suggest a comprehensive physiological mechanism through which light exposure affects growth.  
  Address College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27098210 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1424  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Seltmann, S.; Trost, L.; Ter Maat, A.; Gahr, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Natural melatonin fluctuation and its minimally invasive simulation in the zebra finch Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PeerJ Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 4 Issue Pages e1939  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Melatonin is a key hormone in the regulation of circadian rhythms of vertebrates, including songbirds. Understanding diurnal melatonin fluctuations and being able to reverse or simulate natural melatonin levels are critical to investigating the influence of melatonin on various behaviors such as singing in birds. Here we give a detailed overview of natural fluctuations in plasma melatonin concentration throughout the night in the zebra finch. As shown in previous studies, we confirm that “lights off” initiates melatonin production at night in a natural situation. Notably, we find that melatonin levels return to daytime levels as early as two hours prior to the end of the dark-phase in some individuals and 30 min before “lights on” in all animals, suggesting that the presence of light in the morning is not essential for cessation of melatonin production in zebra finches. Thus, the duration of melatonin production seems not to be specified by the length of night and might therefore be less likely to directly couple circadian and annual rhythms. Additionally, we show that natural melatonin levels can be successfully simulated through a combination of light-treatment (daytime levels during subjective night) and the application of melatonin containing skin-cream (nighttime levels during subjective day). Moreover, natural levels and their fluctuation in the transition from day to night can be imitated, enabling the decoupling of the effects of melatonin, for example on neuronal activity, from sleep and circadian rhythmicity. Taken together, our high-resolution profile of natural melatonin levels and manipulation techniques open up new possibilities to answer various melatonin related questions in songbirds.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1425  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Contel, T.M.; Ferrandis, I.G.; Ferrandis, X.G. url  openurl
  Title Light pollution in natural science textbooks in Spanish secondary education Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication European Journal of Science and Mathematics Education Abbreviated Journal Eur. J. Sci. Math. Ed.  
  Volume 4 Issue 2 Pages 129-139  
  Keywords Education; Light pollution, Secondary education, Natural science textbooks, Spanish secondary education curriculum  
  Abstract Light pollution has emerged with the industrial development in recent decades. It is becoming a significant environmental issue for cities today and it will probably become more important in the near future. However, very little research has been carried out on this issue in the field of science teaching, despite there being a general agreement that education has an important contribution to make in the protection of the environment. This research analyses this problem in secondary education, through the official curriculum and textbooks published for the Valencian Region (Spain).  We have based the research on the “Content analysis” method. Light pollution, despite being included in the Spanish compulsory secondary education curriculum, is an issue that is barely touched on in the majority of the first and second year Natural Science textbooks analysed.  
  Address Department of Nursing, Research and Health Care Managemen, Ctatholic University of Valencia “San Vicente Martir”, Valencia, Spain; ignacio.garcia‐ferrandis(at)uv.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2301-251X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1433  
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Author Xu, M.; He, C.; Liu, Z.; Dou, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How Did Urban Land Expand in China between 1992 and 2015? A Multi-Scale Landscape Analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 11 Issue 5 Pages e0154839  
  Keywords remote sensing  
  Abstract Effective and timely quantification of the spatiotemporal pattern of urban expansion in China is important for the assessment of its environmental effects. However, the dynamics of the most recent urban expansions in China since 2012 have not yet been adequately explained due to a lack of current information. In this paper, our objective was to quantify spatiotemporal patterns of urban expansion in China between 1992 and 2015. First, we extracted information on urban expansion in China between 1992 and 2015 by integrating nighttime light data, vegetation index data, and land surface temperature data. Then we analyzed the spatiotemporal patterns of urban expansion at the national and regional scales, as well as at that of urban agglomerations. We found that China experienced a rapid and large-scale process of urban expansion between 1992 and 2015, with urban land increasing from 1.22 x 104 km2 to 7.29 x 104 km2, increasing in size nearly fivefold and with an average annual growth rate of 8.10%, almost 2.5 times as rapid as the global average. We also found that urban land in China expanded mainly by occupying 3.31 x 104 km2 of cropland, which comprised 54.67% of the total area of expanded urban land. Among the three modes of growth-infilling, edge expansion, and leapfrog-edge expansion was the main cause of cropland loss. Cropland loss resulting from edge expansion of urban land totalled 2.51 x 104 km2, accounting for over 75% of total cropland loss. We suggest that effective future management with respect to edge expansion of urban land is needed to protect cropland in China.  
  Address Academy of Disaster Reduction and Emergency Management, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27144589; PMCID:PMC4856333 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1438  
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Author Degen, T.; Mitesser, O.; Perkin, E.K.; Weiss, N.-S.; Oehlert, M.; Mattig, E.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Street lighting: sex-independent impacts on moth movement Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Biology  
  Abstract 1.Artificial lights have become an integral and welcome part of our urban and peri-urban environments. However, recent research has highlighted the potentially negative ecological consequences of ubiquitous artificial light. In particular, insects, especially moths, are expected to be negatively impacted by the presence of artificial lights. Previous research with light traps has shown a male-biased attraction to light in moths. 2.In this study, we sought to determine if street lights could limit moth dispersal and if there was any sex bias in attraction to light. More specifically, we aimed to determine sex specific attraction radii for moths to street lights. 3.We tested these hypotheses by collecting moths for two years at an experimental setup. To estimate the attraction radii we developed a Markov model and related it to the acquired data. 4.Utilizing multinomial statistics, we found that attraction rates to lights in the middle of the matrix were substantially lower than predicted by the null hypothesis of equal attraction level (0.44 times). With the Markov model, we estimated that a corner-light was 2.77 times more attractive than a wing-light with an equivalent attraction radius of c. 23m around each light. We found neither sexual differences in the attraction rate nor in the attraction radius of males and females. Since we captured three times more males than females, we conclude that sex ratios are representative of operational sex ratios or of different flight activities. 5.These results provide evidence for street lights to limit moth dispersal, and that they seem to act equally on male and female moths. Consequently, public lighting might divide a suitable landscape into many small habitats. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume i) that public lighting near hedges and bushes or field margins reduces the quality of these important habitat structures, and ii) that public lighting near important habitat structures but not interfering with local movement may affect moth movement between patches. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27146262 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1439  
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