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Author Esaki, Y.; Kitajima, T.; Ito, Y.; Koike, S.; Nakao, Y.; Tsuchiya, A.; Hirose, M.; Iwata, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Wearing blue light-blocking glasses in the evening advances circadian rhythms in the patients with delayed sleep phase disorder: An open-label trial Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages 1037-1044  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract It has been recently discovered that blue wavelengths form the portion of the visible electromagnetic spectrum that most potently regulates circadian rhythm. We investigated the effect of blue light-blocking glasses in subjects with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). This open-label trial was conducted over 4 consecutive weeks. The DSPD patients were instructed to wear blue light-blocking amber glasses from 21:00 p.m. to bedtime, every evening for 2 weeks. To ascertain the outcome of this intervention, we measured dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) and actigraphic sleep data at baseline and after the treatment. Nine consecutive DSPD patients participated in this study. Most subjects could complete the treatment with the exception of one patient who hoped for changing to drug therapy before the treatment was completed. The patients who used amber lens showed an advance of 78 min in DLMO value, although the change was not statistically significant (p = 0.145). Nevertheless, the sleep onset time measured by actigraph was advanced by 132 min after the treatment (p = 0.034). These data suggest that wearing amber lenses may be an effective and safe intervention for the patients with DSPD. These findings also warrant replication in a larger patient cohort with controlled observations.  
  Address a Department of Psychiatry , Fujita Health University School of Medicine , Aichi , Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27322730 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1488  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Connelly, S.J.; Stoeckel, J.A.; Gitzen, R.A.; Williamson, C.E.; Gonzalez, M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of Clonal Selection on Daphnia Tolerance to Dark Experimental Conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 11 Issue 7 Pages e0159628  
  Keywords Darkness, Animals  
  Abstract Recent studies have demonstrated substantial effects of environmental stress that vary among clones. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV) is an important abiotic stressor that is highly variable in aquatic ecosystems due to diel and seasonal variations in incident sunlight as well as to differences in the UV transparency of water among water bodies, the depth distribution of organisms, and the ability of organisms to detect and respond to UV. In contrast to the convention that all UV is damaging, evidence is accumulating for the beneficial effects of exposure to low levels of UV radiation. Whereas UV has been frequently observed as the primary light-related stressor, herein we present evidence that dark conditions may be similarly “stressful” (reduction of overall fitness), and stress responses vary among clones of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia parvula. We have identified a significant relationship between survivorship and reduced fecundity of clones maintained in dark conditions, but no correlation between tolerance of the clones to dark and UV radiation. Low tolerance to dark conditions can have negative effects not only on accumulated stresses in organisms (e.g. the repair of UV-induced damage in organisms with photolyase), but potentially on the overall physiology and fitness of organisms. Our results support recent evidence of the beneficial effects of low-level UV exposure for some organisms.  
  Address Department of Biology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27434210 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1491  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Keshet-Sitton, A.; Or-Chen, K.; Yitzhak, S.; Tzabary, I.; Haim, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light and the City: Breast Cancer Risk Factors Differ Between Urban and Rural Women in Israel Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Integrative Cancer Therapies Abbreviated Journal Integr Cancer Ther  
  Volume 16 Issue 2 Pages 176-187  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Women are exposed to indoor and outdoor artificial light at night (ALAN) in urban and rural environments. Excessive exposure to hazardous ALAN containing short wavelength light may suppress pineal melatonin production and lead to an increased breast cancer (BC) risk. Our objective was to address the differences in BC risks related to light exposure in urban and rural communities. We examined indoor and outdoor light habits of BC patients and controls that had lived in urban and rural areas in a 5-year period, 10 to 15 years before the time of the study. Individual data, night time sleeping habits and individual exposure to ALAN habits were collected using a questionnaire. A total of 252 women (110 BC patients and 142 controls) participated in this study. The sample was divided to subgroups according to dwelling area and disease status. Age matching was completed between all subgroups. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for urban and rural women separately, using binary logistic regression. OR results of urban population (92 BC patients and 72 control) revealed that BC risk increases with daily use of cellphone (OR = 2.13, 95% CI = 1.01-4.49, P < .05) and residence near strong ALAN sources (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 0.99-2.30, P < .06). Nevertheless, BC risk decreases if a woman was born in Israel (OR = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.21-0.93, P < .03), longer sleep duration (OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.53-1.05, P < .1), and reading with bed light illumination before retiring to sleep (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.61-0.96, P < .02). Furthermore, in the rural population (18 BC patients and 66 control) BC risk increases with the number of years past since the last menstruation (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.03-1.22, P < .01). However, BC risk decreases with longer sleep duration (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.24-1.14, P < .1), reading with room light illumination before retiring to sleep (OR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.29-1.06, P < .07), and sleeping with closed shutters during the night (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.41-1.04, P < .08). These data support the idea that indoor and outdoor nighttime light exposures differ between urban and rural women. Therefore, we suggest that women can influence BC risk and incidence by applying protective personal lighting habits. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed to strengthen the results.  
  Address University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1534-7354 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27440788 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1492  
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Author Wambrauw, D.Z.K.; Kashiwatani, T.; Komura, A.; Hasegawa, H.; Narita, K.; Oku, S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Honda, K.; Maeda, omoo url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of Supplemental Light on the Quality of Green Asparagus Spears in Winter &lsquo;Fusekomi&rsquo; Forcing Culture Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Environment Control in Biology Abbreviated Journal Environmental Control in Biology  
  Volume 54 Issue 3 Pages 147-152  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Winter ‘fusekomi’ forcing culture of asparagus is becoming popular in Japan because the method can make production of asparagus possible during cold season. However, there are some problems such as color of the spear is pale, and rutin content is lower compared to spring harvest due to the low light intensity, especially in the production area which has much snow and short sunshine. The objective of this study was to clarify the effect of supplemental lighting on the yield, rutin content, sugar component (fructose, glucose, sucrose), and the color of spears. The experiments were conducted by using different irradiation time and different numbers of fluorescent lamps hanging on the tunnel poles over the cultivation bed on the winter ‘fusekomi’ forcing culture. Compared to the control, rutin content was significantly increased under supplemental lighting plots. No significant difference or negative impact was observed in sugar contents and yield on each plot. Moreover, spear color also appeared to be better under supplemental lighting than that of the control. These results suggested that supplemental lighting was effective to improve the quality of asparagus spears (such as rutin contents, spears color), especially for the production area that has low light intensity or in short day conditions.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1880-554X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1493  
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Author Colwell, C.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian Rhythms: Does Burning the Midnight Oil Leave You Weak? Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 26 Issue 14 Pages R669-71  
  Keywords Commentary  
  Abstract A new study shows that nocturnal light exposure rapidly disrupts the central circadian clock as well as reduces motor performance and bone health. These findings provide a striking example of the costs of living in a disrupted light/dark cycle.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Semel Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. Electronic address: CColwell@mednet.ucla.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher (up) Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27458911 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1494  
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