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Author Labuda, M., Pavličková, K., Števová, J. url  openurl
  Title Dark Sky Parks – new impulse for nature tourism development in protected areas (National Park Muranska Planina, Slovakia) Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication e-Review of Tourism Research Abbreviated Journal eRTR  
  Volume 13 Issue 5/6 Pages 536-549  
  Keywords Society; tourism; astrotourism; sustainable tourism; dark sky parks  
  Abstract Dark Sky Parks are one of important measures to support nature tourism in the protected

areas. In this paper, we introduce the concept of astro-tourism on the model area of National Park Muranska Planina (Slovakia), which should lead to the establishment of Dark Sky Park and the implementation of measures focused on dark sky protection, i.e. the elimination of light pollution over model area. The concept includes the measurement of night sky brightness, the selection of suitable observational sites and lighting plan. It is very important from the view of ecology, e.g. by the protection of night animal species. On the other hand, these characteristics can be fully used in new tourism concept in that protected area.
 
  Address Department of Landscape Ecology, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia; mlabuda(at)fns.uniba.sk,  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 2246  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tosini, G.; Ferguson, I.; Tubota, K. url  openurl
  Title Effects of blue light on the circadian system and eye physiology Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Molecular Vision Abbreviated Journal Mol Vis  
  Volume 22 Issue Pages 61-72  
  Keywords Vision; blue light; Circadian Rhythm; eye; physiology  
  Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been used to provide illumination in industrial and commercial environments. LEDs are also used in TVs, computers, smart phones, and tablets. Although the light emitted by most LEDs appears white, LEDs have peak emission in the blue light range (400–490 nm). The accumulating experimental evidence has indicated that exposure to blue light can affect many physiologic functions, and it can be used to treat circadian and sleep dysfunctions. However, blue light can also induce photoreceptor damage. Thus, it is important to consider the spectral output of LED-based light sources to minimize the danger that may be associated with blue light exposure. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the effects of blue light on the regulation of physiologic functions and the possible effects of blue light exposure on ocular health.  
  Address Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher NCBI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1090-0535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 2216  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chaiwat, Thanee openurl 
  Title Night Lights, Economic Growth, and Spatial Inequality of Thailand Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PIER Discussion Papers Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 26 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract This paper explains the method using a set of night light imaginary to estimate GPP of Thailand. This method is quite new but widely acceptable in the area of economics because luminosity of night lights is normally based on the amount of economic activities in each area. The results showed a high and significant correlation betweein the night lights and the GPP growth. Even if the estimation was controlled by some specific factors, such as population density, timing size of agricultural or manufacturing sector, the relationship is still robust. After this relationship is confirmed in the provincial level of Thailand, this research applied the results to show the relationship between economic values and spatial inequality, which indicates new understanding about spatial development patterns.  
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  Language Thai Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2170  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Horrace, W.C.; Rohlin, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How Dark Is Dark? Bright Lights, Big City, Racial Profiling Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Review of Economics and Statistics Abbreviated Journal Review of Economics and Statistics  
  Volume 98 Issue 2 Pages 226-232  
  Keywords Psychology; Public Safety; Society  
  Abstract Grogger and Ridgeway (2006) use the daylight saving time shift to develop a police racial profiling test that is based on differences in driver race visibility and (hence) the race distribution of traffic stops across daylight and darkness. However, urban environments may be well lit at night, eroding the power of their test. We refine their test using streetlight location data in Syracuse, New York, and the results change in the direction of finding profiling of black drivers. Our preferred specification suggests that the odds of a black driver being stopped (relative to nonblack drivers) increase 15% in daylight compared to darkness.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-6535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2167  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yonezawa, T.; Uchida, M.; Tomioka, M.; Matsuki, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lunar Cycle Influences Spontaneous Delivery in Cows Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 11 Issue 8 Pages e0161735  
  Keywords Moonlight; Animals  
  Abstract There is a popular belief that the lunar cycle influences spontaneous delivery in both humans and cattle. To assess this relationship, we investigated the synodic distribution of spontaneous deliveries in domestic Holstein cows. We used retrospective data from 428 spontaneous, full-term deliveries within a three-year period derived from the calving records of a private farm in Hokkaido, Japan. Spontaneous birth frequency increased uniformly from the new moon to the full moon phase and decreased until the waning crescent phase. There was a statistically significant peak between the waxing gibbous and full moon phases compared with those between the last quarter and the waning crescent. These changes were clearly observed in deliveries among multiparous cows, whereas they were not evident in deliveries among nulliparous cows. These data suggest the utility of dairy cows as models for bio-meteorological studies, and indicate that monitoring lunar phases may facilitate comprehensive understanding of parturition.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27580019; PMCID:PMC5006988 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2082  
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