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Author WDS Killgore
Title Lighting the Way to Better Sleep and Health Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Sleep Disorders: Treatment and Care Abbreviated Journal J Sleep Disor: Treat Care
Volume 05 Issue 01 Pages
Keywords Health; Editorial
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2325-9639 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1442
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Author Yuan, D.; Collage, R.D.; Huang, H.; Zhang, X.; Kautza, B.C.; Lewis, A.J.; Zuckerbraun, B.S.; Tsung, A.; Angus, D.C.; Rosengart, M.R.
Title Blue light reduces organ injury from ischemia and reperfusion Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Volume 113 Issue 19 Pages 5239-5244
Keywords Biology
Abstract Evidence suggests that light and circadian rhythms profoundly influence the physiologic capacity with which an organism responds to stress. However, the ramifications of light spectrum on the course of critical illness remain to be determined. Here, we show that acute exposure to bright blue spectrum light reduces organ injury by comparison with bright red spectrum or ambient white fluorescent light in two murine models of sterile insult: warm liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and unilateral renal I/R. Exposure to bright blue light before I/R reduced hepatocellular injury and necrosis and reduced acute kidney injury and necrosis. In both models, blue light reduced neutrophil influx, as evidenced by reduced myeloperoxidase (MPO) within each organ, and reduced the release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a neutrophil chemotactant and key mediator in the pathogenesis of I/R injury. The protective mechanism appeared to involve an optic pathway and was mediated, in part, by a sympathetic (beta3 adrenergic) pathway that functioned independent of significant alterations in melatonin or corticosterone concentrations to regulate neutrophil recruitment. These data suggest that modifying the spectrum of light may offer therapeutic utility in sterile forms of cellular injury.
Address Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 rosengartmr@upmc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27114521 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1443
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Author Stevens, R.G.
Title Circadian disruption and health: Shift work as a harbinger of the toll taken by electric lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 33 Issue 6 Pages 589-594
Keywords Health
Abstract Electric light is one of the signature inventions of human beings. A problem, however, is that electric light can confuse our endogenous circadian rhythmicity. It has now become apparent that circadian biology is fundamental to the functioning and adaptation of almost all life forms. In the modern world, everyone is exposed to electric light during the day and night, and thereby can experience some level of circadian disruption. Perhaps as a canary in the coal mine, study of people whose work hours include nighttime (shift workers) is beginning to yield insights on the adverse health effects of circadian disruption from electric light.
Address a UConn Health Center , Farmington , CT , USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27088628 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1444
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Author Solano Lamphar, H.A.; Kocifaj, M.
Title Urban artificial light emission function determined experimentally using night sky images Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume 181 Issue in press Pages 87-95
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1450
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Author Raap, T.; Pinxten, R.; Eens, M.
Title Artificial light at night disrupts sleep in female great tits (Parus major) during the nestling period, and is followed by a sleep rebound Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut
Volume 215 Issue Pages 125-134
Keywords Biology
Abstract Artificial light at night has been linked to a wide variety of physiological and behavioural consequences in humans and animals. Given that little is known about the impact of light pollution on sleep in wild animals, we tested how experimentally elevated light levels affected sleep behaviour of female songbirds rearing 10 day old chicks. Using a within-subject design, individual sleep behaviour was observed over three consecutive nights in great tits (Parus major), with females sleeping in a natural dark situation on the first and third night, whereas on the second night they were exposed to a light-emitting diode (1.6 lux). Artificial light in the nest box dramatically and significantly affected sleep behaviour, causing females to fall asleep later (95 min; while entry time was unaffected), wake up earlier (74 min) and sleep less (56%). Females spent a greater proportion of the night awake and the frequency of their sleep bouts decreased, while the length of their sleep bouts remained equal. Artificial light also increased begging of chicks at night, which may have contributed to the sleep disruption in females or vice versa. The night following the light treatment, females slept 25% more compared to the first night, which was mainly achieved by increasing the frequency of sleep bouts. Although there was a consistent pattern in how artificial light affected sleep, there was also large among-individual variation in how strongly females were affected. When comparing current results with a similar experiment during winter, our results highlight differences in effects between seasons and underscore the importance of studying light pollution during different seasons. Our study shows that light pollution may have a significant impact on sleep behaviour in free-living animals during the reproductive season, which may provide a potential mechanism by which artificial light affects fitness.
Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology & Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610, Wilrijk, Belgium
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27179331 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1451
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