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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ambient Light Exposure and Changes in Obesity Parameters: A Longitudinal Study of the HEIJO-KYO Cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume Issue Pages jc20154123  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Previous epidemiological studies have suggested an association between nighttime light levels and the prevalence of obesity, although evidence is limited to cross-sectional studies. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the longitudinal association between ambient light exposure and the subsequent changes in obesity parameters. DESIGN AND PARTCIPANTS: Data from 1,110 elderly participants at baseline (mean age, 71.9 years) and data from 766 at follow-up (median, 21 months) were included in this prospective population-based study. MEASURES: Time-dependent ambient light exposure based on objective measurements and changes in the waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. RESULTS: Multivariable mixed-effect linear regression models showed a significant association between light exposure and the %WHtR gain; this was independent of potential confounders (e.g., caloric intake, physical activity, and sleep/wake parameters). Nighttime or evening exposure to higher light intensity was significantly associated with subsequent %WHtR gain. Morning exposure to a longer time >/=500 lux or nighttime exposure to a longer time <3 lux was significantly associated with subsequent %WHtR loss. These association trends were nearly consistent when the BMI was used as an obesity parameter. Increased nighttime light exposure (mean >/=3 vs. <3 lux) was estimated to correspond to a 10.2% WHtR gain and 10.0% increase in BMI over 10 years. CONCLUSIONS: Ambient light exposure, such as increased nighttime or evening light exposure and decreased morning light exposure, was independently associated with subsequent increases in obesity parameters. Further interventional studies are warranted to establish an optimal controlled lighting environment as a preventive option against obesity.  
  Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Nara, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27383113 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1483  
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Author Dorado-Correa, A.M.; Rodríguez-Rocha, M.; Brumm, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Anthropogenic noise, but not artificial light levels predicts song behaviour in an equatorial bird Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal R. Soc. open sci.  
  Volume 3 Issue 7 Pages 160231  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Birds in cities start singing earlier in the morning than in rural areas; commonly this shift is attributed to light pollution. Some studies have suggested that traffic noise has a stronger influence on singing activity than artificial light does. Changes in the timing of singing behaviour in relation to noise and light pollution have only been investigated in the temperate zones. Tropical birds, however, experience little seasonal variation in day length and may be less dependent on light intensity as a modifier for reproductive behaviours such as song. To test whether noise or light pollution has a stronger impact on the dawn chorus of a tropical bird, we investigated the singing behaviour of rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis) in Bogota, Colombia at two times during the year. We found that birds in places with high noise levels started to sing earlier. Light pollution did not have a significant effect. Birds may begin to sing earlier in noisy areas to avoid acoustic masking by traffic later in the morning. Our results also suggest that some tropical birds may be less sensitive to variations in day length and thus less sensitive to light pollution.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2054-5703 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1484  
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Author Ciriminna, R.; Meneguzzo, F.; Albanese, L.; Pagliaro, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Solar street lighting: a key technology en route to sustainability: Solar street lighting technology for sustainability Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Energy and Environment Abbreviated Journal WIREs Energy Environ  
  Volume 6 Issue 2 Pages in press  
  Keywords Lighting, Energy  
  Abstract Today’s solar street LED lights are able to provide reliable, quality lighting both in developing and developed countries, thereby reducing light poverty and the economic and environmental costs of electric outdoor lighting. Rapid technical innovation and dramatic price reduction in the LED, PV module, and battery components, which has occurred in the last 5 years, will accelerate the penetration of solar street LED lights across the world. Applications will not be limited to countries with significant insolation only but will extend to Northern regions as well. This study provides a critical overview of a technology that will play an important role en route to global sustainability.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2041-8396 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1487  
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Author Esaki, Y.; Kitajima, T.; Ito, Y.; Koike, S.; Nakao, Y.; Tsuchiya, A.; Hirose, M.; Iwata, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Wearing blue light-blocking glasses in the evening advances circadian rhythms in the patients with delayed sleep phase disorder: An open-label trial Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages 1037-1044  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract It has been recently discovered that blue wavelengths form the portion of the visible electromagnetic spectrum that most potently regulates circadian rhythm. We investigated the effect of blue light-blocking glasses in subjects with delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). This open-label trial was conducted over 4 consecutive weeks. The DSPD patients were instructed to wear blue light-blocking amber glasses from 21:00 p.m. to bedtime, every evening for 2 weeks. To ascertain the outcome of this intervention, we measured dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) and actigraphic sleep data at baseline and after the treatment. Nine consecutive DSPD patients participated in this study. Most subjects could complete the treatment with the exception of one patient who hoped for changing to drug therapy before the treatment was completed. The patients who used amber lens showed an advance of 78 min in DLMO value, although the change was not statistically significant (p = 0.145). Nevertheless, the sleep onset time measured by actigraph was advanced by 132 min after the treatment (p = 0.034). These data suggest that wearing amber lenses may be an effective and safe intervention for the patients with DSPD. These findings also warrant replication in a larger patient cohort with controlled observations.  
  Address a Department of Psychiatry , Fujita Health University School of Medicine , Aichi , Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27322730 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1488  
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Author Connelly, S.J.; Stoeckel, J.A.; Gitzen, R.A.; Williamson, C.E.; Gonzalez, M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of Clonal Selection on Daphnia Tolerance to Dark Experimental Conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 11 Issue 7 Pages e0159628  
  Keywords Darkness, Animals  
  Abstract Recent studies have demonstrated substantial effects of environmental stress that vary among clones. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV) is an important abiotic stressor that is highly variable in aquatic ecosystems due to diel and seasonal variations in incident sunlight as well as to differences in the UV transparency of water among water bodies, the depth distribution of organisms, and the ability of organisms to detect and respond to UV. In contrast to the convention that all UV is damaging, evidence is accumulating for the beneficial effects of exposure to low levels of UV radiation. Whereas UV has been frequently observed as the primary light-related stressor, herein we present evidence that dark conditions may be similarly “stressful” (reduction of overall fitness), and stress responses vary among clones of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia parvula. We have identified a significant relationship between survivorship and reduced fecundity of clones maintained in dark conditions, but no correlation between tolerance of the clones to dark and UV radiation. Low tolerance to dark conditions can have negative effects not only on accumulated stresses in organisms (e.g. the repair of UV-induced damage in organisms with photolyase), but potentially on the overall physiology and fitness of organisms. Our results support recent evidence of the beneficial effects of low-level UV exposure for some organisms.  
  Address Department of Biology, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27434210 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1491  
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