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Author Yuan, D.; Collage, R.D.; Huang, H.; Zhang, X.; Kautza, B.C.; Lewis, A.J.; Zuckerbraun, B.S.; Tsung, A.; Angus, D.C.; Rosengart, M.R.
Title (up) Blue light reduces organ injury from ischemia and reperfusion Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Volume 113 Issue 19 Pages 5239-5244
Keywords Biology
Abstract Evidence suggests that light and circadian rhythms profoundly influence the physiologic capacity with which an organism responds to stress. However, the ramifications of light spectrum on the course of critical illness remain to be determined. Here, we show that acute exposure to bright blue spectrum light reduces organ injury by comparison with bright red spectrum or ambient white fluorescent light in two murine models of sterile insult: warm liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and unilateral renal I/R. Exposure to bright blue light before I/R reduced hepatocellular injury and necrosis and reduced acute kidney injury and necrosis. In both models, blue light reduced neutrophil influx, as evidenced by reduced myeloperoxidase (MPO) within each organ, and reduced the release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a neutrophil chemotactant and key mediator in the pathogenesis of I/R injury. The protective mechanism appeared to involve an optic pathway and was mediated, in part, by a sympathetic (beta3 adrenergic) pathway that functioned independent of significant alterations in melatonin or corticosterone concentrations to regulate neutrophil recruitment. These data suggest that modifying the spectrum of light may offer therapeutic utility in sterile forms of cellular injury.
Address Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 rosengartmr@upmc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27114521 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1443
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Author Nickla, D.L.; Totonelly, K.
Title (up) Brief light exposure at night disrupts the circadian rhythms in eye growth and choroidal thickness in chicks Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Experimental eye Research Abbreviated Journal Exp Eye Res
Volume 146 Issue Pages 189-195
Keywords Animals
Abstract Changes in ocular growth that lead to myopia or hyperopia are associated with alterations in the circadian rhythms in eye growth, choroidal thickness and intraocular pressure in animal models of emmetropization. Recent studies have shown that light at night has deleterious effects on human health, acting via “circadian disruptions” of various diurnal rhythms, including changes in phase or amplitude. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of brief, 2-hour episodes of light in the middle of the night on the rhythms in axial length and choroidal thickness, and whether these alter eye growth and refractive error in the chick model of myopia. Starting at 2 weeks of age, birds received 2 hours of light between 12:00 am and 2:00 am for 7 days (n=12; total hours of light: 14 hrs). Age-matched controls had a continuous dark night (n=14; 14L/10D). Ocular dimensions were measured using high-frequency A-scan ultrasonography on the first day of the experiment, and again on day 7, at 6-hour intervals, starting at noon (12pm, 6pm, 12am, 6am, 12pm). Measurements during the night were done under a photographic safe-light. These data were used to determine rhythm parameters of phase and amplitude. 2 groups of birds, both experimental (light at night) and control, were measured with ultrasound at various intervals over the course of 4 weeks to determine growth rates. Refractive errors were measured in 6 experimental and 6 control birds at the end of 2 weeks. Eyes of birds in a normal L/D cycle showed sinusoidal 24-hour period diurnal rhythms in axial length and choroid thickness. Light in the middle of the night caused changes in both the rhythms in axial length and choroidal thickness, such that neither could be fit to a sine function having a period of 24 hours. Light caused an acute, transient stimulation in ocular growth rate in the subsequent 6-hour period (12 am to 6 am), that may be responsible for the increased growth rate seen 4 weeks later, and the more myopic refractive error. It also abolished the increase in choroidal thickness that normally occurs between 6 pm and 12 am. We conclude that light at night alters the rhythms in axial length and choroidal thickness in an animal model of eye growth, and that these circadian disruptions might lead to the development of ametropias. These results have implications for the use of light during the night in children.
Address The New England College of Optometry, Boston, MA, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0014-4835 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26970497 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1371
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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.
Title (up) Case study of “Walk”: a video installation integrated into the facade of a store in Zurich/CH Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Professional Lighting Design Abbreviated Journal Prof Lighting Des
Volume Issue 101 Pages 52-58
Keywords Lighting; planning; commentary
Abstract With the rapid development of solid state lighting technology and the availability of LED light sources, coupled with the benefits they offer such as energy efficiency, long lifespan and the fact that they can be controlled and programmed, we are now finding LEDs being more widely used for animated advertising. In spite of the pace at which SSL is developing, or perhaps because of this, there is a distinct lack of evaluation guidelines or recommendations for professional designers. It is therefore essential that more research is carried out on this issue on an international scale, and that experts in the field get their heads together in order to formulate some basic guidelines that can be applied in practice.
Address Faculty of Architecture & Design, Hochschule Wismar, Wismar, Germany; k.zielinska-dabkowska(at)hs-wismar.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Verlag Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1479
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Author Lucas, M.A.; Chahl, J.S.
Title (up) Challenges for biomimetic night time sky polarization navigation Type Conference Article
Year 2016 Publication Proceedings of the SPIE Abbreviated Journal Proc SPIE
Volume 9797 Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; detection of light; biology; polarization; navigation
Abstract Studies on some species of insects have shown them to use the polarization pattern cast by the moon in the night sky to control heading. Additional heading cues are of value to autonomous systems, since the earth’s magnetic field is not uniform, often not available and is substantially modified by local phenomena. In addition to the required low-light sensitivity of a night time polarization compass, additional complexities caused by the relative intensity of terrestrial sources must be overcome. We will show that the end result will tend to be a less reliable compass than the equivalent day time polarization device.
Address Univ. of South Australia, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1430
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Author Stevens, R.G.
Title (up) Circadian disruption and health: Shift work as a harbinger of the toll taken by electric lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 33 Issue 6 Pages 589-594
Keywords Health
Abstract Electric light is one of the signature inventions of human beings. A problem, however, is that electric light can confuse our endogenous circadian rhythmicity. It has now become apparent that circadian biology is fundamental to the functioning and adaptation of almost all life forms. In the modern world, everyone is exposed to electric light during the day and night, and thereby can experience some level of circadian disruption. Perhaps as a canary in the coal mine, study of people whose work hours include nighttime (shift workers) is beginning to yield insights on the adverse health effects of circadian disruption from electric light.
Address a UConn Health Center , Farmington , CT , USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27088628 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1444
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