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Author Tosini, G.; Ferguson, I.; Tubota, K. url  openurl
  Title (up) Effects of blue light on the circadian system and eye physiology Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Molecular Vision Abbreviated Journal Mol Vis  
  Volume 22 Issue Pages 61-72  
  Keywords Vision; blue light; Circadian Rhythm; eye; physiology  
  Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been used to provide illumination in industrial and commercial environments. LEDs are also used in TVs, computers, smart phones, and tablets. Although the light emitted by most LEDs appears white, LEDs have peak emission in the blue light range (400–490 nm). The accumulating experimental evidence has indicated that exposure to blue light can affect many physiologic functions, and it can be used to treat circadian and sleep dysfunctions. However, blue light can also induce photoreceptor damage. Thus, it is important to consider the spectral output of LED-based light sources to minimize the danger that may be associated with blue light exposure. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the effects of blue light on the regulation of physiologic functions and the possible effects of blue light exposure on ocular health.  
  Address Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher NCBI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1090-0535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2216  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Xiaolong, G.; Mo, Z.; Xian, L.; Ce, S.; Changbin, S.; Ying, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Effects of LED light quality on the growth, metabolism, and energy budgets of Haliotis discus discus Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture  
  Volume 453 Issue Pages 31-39  
  Keywords Animals; Abalone; LED; Metabolism; Energy budgets; Haliotis discus; Haliotis discus discus; Photobiology  
  Abstract In this study, a bioenergetics approach was used to examine the effects of different LED light qualities (red, orange, blue, green light, natural light and a dark setting) on the growth and survival of the abalone Haliotis discus discus, and its physiological response mechanism under different light qualities. The results suggest that under blue or green light, the survival rate, specific growth rate, food intake, and food conversion efficiency of H. d. discus were significantly lower than in those groups under red or orange light (P < 0.05). Under red or orange light, pepsin, amylase and cellulose activity was significantly higher than those in any other light quality group (P < 0.05), whereas lipase activity exhibited no significant difference among the light quality groups (P > 0.05). Under blue or green light, lactate dehydrogenase activity and lactic acid content were higher (P < 0.05), suggesting enhanced anaerobic metabolism. Under blue or green light, H. d. discus lost more energy via excretion, feces and respiration than was acquired from its food. Under red or orange light, H. d. discus acquired more energy from its food and lost less energy via excretion and feces; as a result, its assimilation efficiency (K1) and net growth efficiency (K2) were significantly higher than those of any other group (P < 0.05). Therefore, we suggest that red or orange light should be used as a light source for the aquaculture of H. d. discus.  
  Address Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1311  
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Author Gao, X.; Li, X.; Zhang, M.; Chi, L.; Song, C.; Liu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Effects of LED light quality on the growth, survival and metamorphosis ofHaliotis discus hannaiIno larvae Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Aquaculture Research Abbreviated Journal Aquac Res  
  Volume 47 Issue 12 Pages 3705–3717  
  Keywords Animals; Haliotis discus hannai Ino; larva; LED light quality; initial stage of lighting; embryonic development; abalone; photobiology  
  Abstract Light is a key environmental factor influencing the growth, development and survival of aquatic organisms. We examined the effects of different light qualities (red, orange, white, blue, green or no light) and developmental stage at initial lighting [fertilized egg (FE), trochophore larva (TL), or eye-spot larva (EL)] on the growth, development, and survival of larvae of the Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino. Larva-hatching success was significantly higher under blue, green, or no light compared with red, orange or white light (P < 0.05). Larval abnormalities were significantly increased under red, orange or white light compared with all other light qualities (P < 0.05). The incidence of metamorphosis in larvae illuminated from the TL stage was significantly higher under blue compared with other light qualities. Irrespective of the stage at initial illumination, the incidence of metamorphosis was lower in larvae cultured under red, orange or no light compared with other light qualities, but the differences were not significant (P > 0.05). Juvenile survival was significantly higher under blue or green compared with other light qualities (P < 0.05), with no significant effect of stage at initial illumination (P > 0.05). Larval size at completion of the shell was unaffected by stage at initial illumination, but was greater under blue or green light, while size at metamorphosis was greatest following illumination with blue or green light since the TL or EL stage (P < 0.05). Metamorphosis time was shortest with blue or green light and in cultures illuminated from the FE or TL stage (P < 0.05). Larval development from the FE to formation of the fourth tubule on the cephalic tentacles was fastest in larvae exposed since the FE or TL stage to blue or green light, compared with other light qualities (P < 0.05). However, there was no difference in terms of the rate of development from the FE to the TL stage between cultures lit or unlit since the FE egg stage (P > 0.05). These results suggest that a blue or green light source applied from the TL stage can increase the hatching and yield of H. discus hannai Ino, with important implications for the development of the aquaculture industry.  
  Address Research and Development Center of Marine Biotechnology, Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Science, 7 Nanhai Road, Qingdao 266071, Shandong Province, China; 18354292961(at)163.com.  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1355557X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1340  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fallows, C.; Fallows, M.; Hammerschlag, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Effects of lunar phase on predator-prey interactions between white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) and Cape fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Environmental Biology of Fishes Abbreviated Journal Environ Biol Fish  
  Volume 99 Issue 11 Pages 805-812  
  Keywords Moonlight; Animals  
  Abstract Predator-prey relationships can be influenced by environmental conditions, including changes in moon phase and associated lunar illumination. Two primary hypotheses have been proposed underlying the effects of moonlight on predator-prey interactions: the predation risk hypothesis and visual acuity hypothesis. However, few studies have tested these hypotheses during twilight hours or involved large mobile aquatic species. In the present study, we evaluated these hypotheses using data collected over 16 years on predator-prey interactions between white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) and Cape fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus) at sunrise. Data from 1476 natural predation events demonstrated shark attack frequency and seal capture success was significantly higher at sunrise during periods of low (0–10 %) versus high (90–100 %) lunar illumination, which is consistent with the visual acuity hypothesis. We propose that during full moon periods, white sharks at night are at a visual and tactical advantage over seals which are silhouetted at the surface in the moonlight and thus easier to isolate in darkness, while sharks remain camouflaged hunting from below through deep water. However, at sunrise, we hypothesize this advantage shifts to seals as the added lunar illumination, combined with emerging sunlight, may decrease shark stealth and increase the ability of seals to detect and avoid sharks. These finding suggest that lunar effects on predator-prey dynamics can be context specific, likely moderated by visual acuity of predators and prey which may change according to the photoperiod.  
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  ISSN 0378-1909 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3141  
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Author Matsuda, R.; Yamano, T.; Murakami, K.; Fujiwara, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Effects of spectral distribution and photosynthetic photon flux density for overnight LED light irradiation on tomato seedling growth and leaf injury Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal Scientia Horticulturae  
  Volume 198 Issue Pages 363-369  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-4238 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1387  
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