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Author Luarte, T.; Bonta, C.C.; Silva-Rodriguez, E.A.; Quijon, P.A.; Miranda, C.; Farias, A.A.; Duarte, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution reduces activity, food consumption and growth rates in a sandy beach invertebrate Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut  
  Volume 218 Issue Pages 1147-1153  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The continued growth of human activity and infrastructure has translated into a widespread increase in light pollution. Natural daylight and moonlight cycles play a fundamental role for many organisms and ecological processes, so an increase in light pollution may have profound effects on communities and ecosystem services. Studies assessing ecological light pollution (ELP) effects on sandy beach organisms have lagged behind the study of other sources of disturbance. Hence, we assessed the influence of this stressor on locomotor activity, foraging behavior, absorption efficiency and growth rate of adults of the talitrid amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata. In the field, an artificial light system was assembled to assess the local influence of artificial light conditions on the amphipod's locomotor activity and use of food patches in comparison to natural (ambient) conditions. Meanwhile in the laboratory, two experimental chambers were set to assess amphipod locomotor activity, consumption rates, absorption efficiency and growth under artificial light in comparison to natural light-dark cycles. Our results indicate that artificial light have significantly adverse effects on the activity patterns and foraging behavior of the amphipods, resulting on reduced consumption and growth rates. Given the steady increase in artificial light pollution here and elsewhere, sandy beach communities could be negatively affected, with unexpected consequences for the whole ecosystem.  
  Address Departamento de Ecologia y Biodiversidad, Facultad de Ecologia y Recursos Naturales, Universidad Andres Bello, Republica no. 440, Santiago, Chile; Center for the Study of Multiple-drivers on Marine Socio-ecological Systems (MUSELS), Universidad de Concepcion, Concepcion, Chile. Electronic address: cristian.duarte@unab.cl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27589894 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1516  
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Author Yonezawa, T.; Uchida, M.; Tomioka, M.; Matsuki, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lunar Cycle Influences Spontaneous Delivery in Cows Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 11 Issue 8 Pages e0161735  
  Keywords Moonlight; Animals  
  Abstract There is a popular belief that the lunar cycle influences spontaneous delivery in both humans and cattle. To assess this relationship, we investigated the synodic distribution of spontaneous deliveries in domestic Holstein cows. We used retrospective data from 428 spontaneous, full-term deliveries within a three-year period derived from the calving records of a private farm in Hokkaido, Japan. Spontaneous birth frequency increased uniformly from the new moon to the full moon phase and decreased until the waning crescent phase. There was a statistically significant peak between the waxing gibbous and full moon phases compared with those between the last quarter and the waning crescent. These changes were clearly observed in deliveries among multiparous cows, whereas they were not evident in deliveries among nulliparous cows. These data suggest the utility of dairy cows as models for bio-meteorological studies, and indicate that monitoring lunar phases may facilitate comprehensive understanding of parturition.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27580019; PMCID:PMC5006988 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2082  
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Author Canazei, M.; Pohl, W.; Bliem, H.R.; Weiss, E.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Acute effects of different light spectra on simulated night-shift work without circadian alignment Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 34 Issue 3 Pages 303-317  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Short-wavelength and short-wavelength-enhanced light have a strong impact on night-time working performance, subjective feelings of alertness and circadian physiology. In the present study, we investigated acute effects of white light sources with varied reduced portions of short wavelengths on cognitive and visual performance, mood and cardiac output.Thirty-one healthy subjects were investigated in a balanced cross-over design under three light spectra in a simulated night-shift paradigm without circadian adaptation.Exposure to the light spectrum with the largest attenuation of short wavelengths reduced heart rate and increased vagal cardiac parameters during the night compared to the other two light spectra without deleterious effects on sustained attention, working memory and subjective alertness. In addition, colour discrimination capability was significantly decreased under this light source.To our knowledge, the present study for the first time demonstrates that polychromatic white light with reduced short wavelengths, fulfilling current lighting standards for indoor illumination, may have a positive impact on cardiac physiology of night-shift workers without detrimental consequences for cognitive performance and alertness.  
  Address c Department of Psychology , University of Graz , Graz , Austria  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27579732 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1519  
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Author Lagiou, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Shedding light on the role of circadian disruption in breast cancer etiology Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication European Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Epidemiol  
  Volume 31 Issue 9 Pages 807-810  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. pdlagiou@med.uoa.gr  
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  ISSN 0393-2990 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27550370 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1508  
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Author Cho, C.-H.; Moon, J.-H.; Yoon, H.-K.; Kang, S.-G.; Geum, D.; Son, G.-H.; Lim, J.-M.; Kim, L.; Lee, E.-I.; Lee, H.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Molecular circadian rhythm shift due to bright light exposure before bedtime is related to subthreshold bipolarity Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages 31846  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract This study examined the link between circadian rhythm changes due to bright light exposure and subthreshold bipolarity. Molecular circadian rhythms, polysomnography, and actigraphy data were studied in 25 young, healthy male subjects, divided into high and low mood disorder questionnaire (MDQ) score groups. During the first 2 days of the study, the subjects were exposed to daily-living light (150 lux) for 4 hours before bedtime. Saliva and buccal cells were collected 5 times a day for 2 consecutive days. During the subsequent 5 days, the subjects were exposed to bright light (1,000 lux), and saliva and buccal cell samples were collected in the same way. Molecular circadian rhythms were analyzed using sine regression. Circadian rhythms of cortisol (F = 16.956, p < 0.001) and relative PER1/ARNTL gene expression (F = 122.1, p < 0.001) showed a delayed acrophase in both groups after bright light exposure. The high MDQ score group showed a significant delay in acrophase compared to the low MDQ score group only in salivary cortisol (F = 8.528, p = 0.008). The high MDQ score group showed hypersensitivity in cortisol rhythm shift after bright light exposure, suggesting characteristic molecular circadian rhythm changes in the high MDQ score group may be related to biological processes downstream from core circadian clock gene expression.  
  Address Department of Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27545669 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1513  
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