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Author Koo, Y.S.; Jung, K.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Oldies but goodies: The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) data can be used with the data obtained before the year 2012 Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages 946-948  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address b Department of Neurology , Seoul National University College of Medicine , Seoul , South Korea  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27253844 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1463  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Macgregor, C.J.; Evans, D.M.; Fox, R.; Pocock, M.J.O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The dark side of street lighting: impacts on moths and evidence for the disruption of nocturnal pollen transport Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 2 Pages 697-707  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Among drivers of environmental change, artificial light at night is relatively poorly understood, yet is increasing on a global scale. The community-level effects of existing street lights on moths and their biotic interactions have not previously been studied. Using a combination of sampling methods at matched-pairs of lit and unlit sites, we found significant effects of street lighting: moth abundance at ground level was halved at lit sites, species richness was >25% lower, and flight activity at the level of the light was 70% greater. Furthermore, we found that 23% of moths carried pollen of at least 28 plant species and that there was a consequent overall reduction in pollen transport at lit sites. These findings support the disruptive impact of lights on moth activity, which is one proposed mechanism driving moth declines, and suggest that street lighting potentially impacts upon pollination by nocturnal invertebrates. We highlight the importance of considering both direct and cascading impacts of artificial light.  
  Address Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean Building, Benson Lane, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 8BB, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27251575 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1520  
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Author Datta, S.; Samanta, D.; Sinha, P.; Chakrabarti, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Gender features and estrous cycle variations of nocturnal behavior of mice after a single exposure to light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume 164 Issue Pt A Pages 113-122  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light at night alters behavior and cognitive performances in rodents, the variations of which in gender and stages of reproductive cycle in females are elusive. Young mice habituated in light:dark (12:12h) cycle were given a single exposure of light (100lx) at early night for one hour duration followed by experimentations in open field (closed wall with circular big arena), elevated plus maze and square habituated field for memory performance using novel object recognition task. Light effects were compared with results found during without light conditions. Proestrous females appeared to have greater locomotor activity, less anxiety and better memory performance compared to the diestrous females at night without light exposure. The status of locomotor activity, anxiety and memory performance of male mice at night without light exposure appeared to be comparable to females where the stage of estrous cycle is important to characterize the nocturnal behavior of male mice. Light maximally affected proestrous females with decrease in locomotor activity, increase in anxiety and failure of memory performance. Male and diestrous female mice performed memory performance without alteration of locomotor activity and anxiety after exposure to light where males performed better memory performance with greater locomotor activity and more anxiety compared to that of diestrous females. The present study characterizes the mice nocturnal behavior with and without a single exposure to light stimuli with its gender features and estrous cycle variation. In addition, the study indicates an association of memory performance with locomotor activity and anxiety in mice nocturnal behavior.  
  Address Department of Physiology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, West Bengal, India. Electronic address: ncphysiolcu@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27241632 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1521  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Quiles, C.L.; de Oliveira, M.A.B.; Tonon, A.C.; Hidalgo, M.P.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Biological adaptability under seasonal variation of light/dark cycles Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages 964-971  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract 3A substantial amount of experimental models designed to understand rhythms entrainment and the effects of different regimens of light exposure on health have been proposed. However, many of them do not relate to what occurs in real life. Our objective was to evaluate the influence of “seasonal-like” variation in light/dark cycles on biological rhythms. Twenty adult male Wistar rats were assigned to three groups: control (CT), kept in 12:12 light/dark (LD) cycle; long photoperiod/short photoperiod (LP/SP), kept in 16.5:7.5 LD cycle for 18 days (phase A), then 17 days of gradual reductions in light time (phase B), then 18 days of shorter exposure (7.5:16.5 LD cycle, phase C); short photoperiod/long photoperiod (SP/LP) group, with same modifications as the LP/SP group, but in reverse order, starting phase A in 7.5:16.5 LD cycle. Activity and temperature were recorded constantly, and melatonin and cortisol concentrations were measured twice. Activity and temperature acrophases of all groups changed according to light. The correlation between activity and temperature was, overall, significantly lower for SP/LP group compared with LP/SP and CT groups. Regarding melatonin concentration, LP/SP group showed significant positive correlation between phase A and C (p = 0.018). Animals changed temperature and activity according to photoperiod and demonstrated better adaptability in transitioning from long to short photoperiod. Since this model imitates seasonal variation in light in a species that is largely used in behavioral experiments, it reveals promising methods to improve the reliability of experimental models and of further environmental health research.  
  Address b Pos-graduacao em Psiquiatria e Ciencias do Comportamento, Faculdade de Medicina (FAMED) , Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS) , Porto Alegre , Brasil  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27222076 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1512  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Phelps, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A powerful non-pharmacologic treatment for mania – virtually Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Bipolar Disorders Abbreviated Journal Bipolar Disord  
  Volume 18 Issue 4 Pages 379-382  
  Keywords Commentary; Human Health  
  Abstract  
  Address Samaritan Mental Health, Corvallis, OR, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1398-5647 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27218661 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1511  
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