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Author Rybnikova, N.A.; Haim, A.; Portnova, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Is Prostate Cancer Incidence Worldwide Linked to Artificial Light at Night Exposures? Earlier Findings' Revisit and Current Trends' Analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Archives of Environmental & Occupational Health Abbreviated Journal Arch Environ Occup Health  
  Volume 72 Issue 2 Pages 111-122  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Widespread use of artificial light at night (ALAN) might contribute to the global burden of hormone-dependent cancers. However, previous attempts to verify this association in population-level studies have been sparse. Using the GLOBOCAN, US-DMSP and World Bank's 2010-2012 databases, we studied the association between ALAN and prostate cancer (PC) incidence in 180 countries worldwide, controlling for several country-level confounders. As our analysis indicates, the PC-ALAN association emerged marginally significant when year-2012 PC age-standardized rate data were compared with ALAN levels (t = 1.886, P<0.1); while this association emerged as more significant (t>2.7; P<0.01) when only 110 countries with well-maintained cancer registries were analyzed. Along with other variables, ALAN explains up to 79% of PC ASRs variability. PC-ALAN association appears to vary regionally, with the greatest deviations in Central Africa, Small Island Developing States, South East Asia and Gulf States.  
  Address a Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Faculty of Management, University of Haifa, 31805, Carmel, Mt, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1933-8244 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27029744 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1412  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Reinberg, A.; Smolensky, M.H.; Touitou, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The full moon as a synchronizer of circa-monthly biological rhythms: Chronobiologic perspectives based on multidisciplinary naturalistic research Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 5 Pages 465-479  
  Keywords Moonlight; Commentary; Animals; Plants; Human Health  
  Abstract Biological rhythmicity is presumed to be an advantageous genetic adaptation of fitness and survival value resulting from evolution of life forms in an environment that varies predictably-in-time during the 24 h, month, and year. The 24 h light/dark cycle is the prime synchronizer of circadian periodicities, and its modulation over the course of the year, in terms of daytime photoperiod length, is a prime synchronizer of circannual periodicities. Circadian and circannual rhythms have been the major research focus of most scientists. Circa-monthly rhythms triggered or synchronized by the 29.5 day lunar cycle of nighttime light intensity, or specifically the light of the full moon, although explored in waterborne and certain other species, have received far less study, perhaps because of associations with ancient mythology and/or an attitude naturalistic studies are of lesser merit than ones that entail molecular mechanisms. In this editorial, we cite our recent discovery through multidisciplinary naturalistic investigation of a highly integrated circadian, circa-monthly, and circannual time structure, synchronized by the natural ambient nyctohemeral, lunar, and annual light cycles, of the Peruvian apple cactus (C. peruvianus) flowering and reproductive processes that occur in close temporal coordination with like rhythms of the honey bee as its pollinator. This finding led us to explore the preservation of this integrated biological time structure, synchronized and/or triggered by environmental light cues and cycles, in the reproduction of other species, including Homo sapiens, and how the artificial light environment of today in which humans reside may be negatively affecting human reproduction efficiency.  
  Address a Unite de Chronobiologie , Fondation A de Rothschild , Paris cedex 19 , France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27019304 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1460  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Higuchi, S.; Lee, S.-I.; Kozaki, T.; Harada, T.; Tanaka, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Late circadian phase in adults and children is correlated with use of high color temperature light at home at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 448-452  
  Keywords Children; circadian rhythm; light; melatonin  
  Abstract Light is the strongest synchronizer of human circadian rhythms, and exposure to residential light at night reportedly causes a delay of circadian rhythms. The present study was conducted to investigate the association between color temperature of light at home and circadian phase of salivary melatonin in adults and children. Twenty healthy children (mean age: 9.7 year) and 17 of their parents (mean age: 41.9 years) participated in the experiment. Circadian phase assessments were made with dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). There were large individual variations in DLMO both in adults and children. The average DLMO in adults and in children were 21:50 +/- 1:12 and 20:55 +/- 0:44, respectively. The average illuminance and color temperature of light at eye level were 139.6 +/- 82.7 lx and 3862.0 +/- 965.6 K, respectively. There were significant correlations between color temperature of light and DLMO in adults (r = 0.735, p < 0.01) and children (r = 0.479, p < 0.05), although no significant correlations were found between illuminance level and DLMO. The results suggest that high color temperature light at home might be a cause of the delay of circadian phase in adults and children.  
  Address a Department of Human Science, Faculty of Design , Kyushu University , Fukuoka , Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27010525 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1404  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rowse, E.G.; Harris, S.; Jones, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Switch from Low-Pressure Sodium to Light Emitting Diodes Does Not Affect Bat Activity at Street Lights Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages e0150884  
  Keywords Animals; bats; England; United Kingdom; low-pressure sodium; LPS; LED; LED lighting; ecology; urban ecology; Feeding Behavior  
  Abstract We used a before-after-control-impact paired design to examine the effects of a switch from low-pressure sodium (LPS) to light emitting diode (LED) street lights on bat activity at twelve sites across southern England. LED lights produce broad spectrum 'white' light compared to LPS street lights that emit narrow spectrum, orange light. These spectral differences could influence the abundance of insects at street lights and thereby the activity of the bats that prey on them. Most of the bats flying around the LPS lights were aerial-hawking species, and the species composition of bats remained the same after the switch-over to LED. We found that the switch-over from LPS to LED street lights did not affect the activity (number of bat passes), or the proportion of passes containing feeding buzzes, of those bat species typically found in close proximity to street lights in suburban environments in Britain. This is encouraging from a conservation perspective as many existing street lights are being, or have been, switched to LED before the ecological consequences have been assessed. However, lighting of all spectra studied to date generally has a negative impact on several slow-flying bat species, and LED lights are rarely frequented by these 'light-intolerant' bat species.  
  Address School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, University of Bristol, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TQ, United Kingdom; liz.rowse(at)bristol.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher PLOS Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27008274 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1403  
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Author Erren, T.C.; Morfeld, P.; Foster, R.G.; Reiter, R.J.; Gross, J.V.; Westermann, I.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep and cancer: Synthesis of experimental data and meta-analyses of cancer incidence among some 1 500 000 study individuals in 13 countries Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 325-350  
  Keywords Human Health; Cancer; chronodisruption; meta-analyses; napping; sleep and circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD); sleep duration; sleep quality; sleep timing; Circadian Rhythm; sleep; Oncogenesis  
  Abstract Sleep and its impact on physiology and pathophysiology are researched at an accelerating pace and from many different angles. Experiments provide evidence for chronobiologically plausible links between chronodisruption and sleep and circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD), on the one hand, and the development of cancer, on the other. Epidemiological evidence from cancer incidence among some 1 500 000 study individuals in 13 countries regarding associations with sleep duration, napping or “poor sleep” is variable and inconclusive. Combined adjusted relative risks (meta-RRs) for female breast cancer, based on heterogeneous data, were 1.01 (95% CI: 0.97-1.06). Meta-RRs for cancers of the colorectum and of the lung in women and men and for prostate cancer were 1.08 (95% CI: 1.03-1.13), 1.11 (95% CI: 1.00-1.22) and 1.05 (95% CI: 0.83-1.33), respectively. The significantly increased meta-RRs for colorectal cancer, based on homogeneous data, warrant targeted study. However, the paramount epidemiological problem inhibiting valid conclusions about the associations between sleep and cancer is the probable misclassification of the exposures to facets of sleep over time. Regarding the inevitable conclusion that more research is needed to answer How are sleep and cancer linked in humans? we offer eight sets of recommendations for future studies which must take note of the complexity of multidirectional relationships.  
  Address a Institute and Policlinic for Occupational Medicine, Environmental Medicine and Prevention Research , University of Cologne , Cologne , Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27003385 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1407  
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