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Author Bergs, R. openurl 
  Title Exploring the Spatial Economy by Night Type Report
  Year 2016 Publication n/a Abbreviated Journal n/a  
  Volume n/a Issue n/a Pages n/a  
  Keywords Economics; DMSP; DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; spatial distribution  
  Abstract Night satellite images may offer an interesting tool to generate socio-economically relevant data and to analyse the evolution of space, e.g. cities or rural areas, and how spatial units interact over time. This paper is just an essay with preliminary ideas for discussion; the approach is explorative-methodological rather than one putting an empirical focus on a defined research item. Empirics discussed in this paper are just various examples collected from tinkering.

The DMSP-OLS images and adequate image analysis software such as ImageJ (in some cases to be complemented by further statistics software) provide a useful perspective for the analysis of spatial change. Since there is a stable and significant correlation between social and economic variables (population density, GDP PPP) and luminosity, such image analyses contain important information on spatial economic development. Analysis of night imagery is certainly not adequate to replace the statistical analysis of regional data, but it is a good tool to confirm and illustrate patterns of spatial heterogeneity and spatial dependence over time.
 
  Address PRAC – Bergs & Issa Partnership Co., Bad Soden, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher n/a Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Planung & Forschung Spolicy Research & Consultancy Discussion Paper Series Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN n/a ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1392  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chaiwat, Thanee openurl 
  Title Night Lights, Economic Growth, and Spatial Inequality of Thailand Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PIER Discussion Papers Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 26 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract This paper explains the method using a set of night light imaginary to estimate GPP of Thailand. This method is quite new but widely acceptable in the area of economics because luminosity of night lights is normally based on the amount of economic activities in each area. The results showed a high and significant correlation betweein the night lights and the GPP growth. Even if the estimation was controlled by some specific factors, such as population density, timing size of agricultural or manufacturing sector, the relationship is still robust. After this relationship is confirmed in the provincial level of Thailand, this research applied the results to show the relationship between economic values and spatial inequality, which indicates new understanding about spatial development patterns.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Thai Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2170  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sloane, M.; Slater, D.; Entwistle, J. openurl 
  Title Tackling Social Inequalities in Public Lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Society  
  Abstract 2This report is based on research findings of the Configuring Light/Staging the Social research programme (CL) based at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), as well as on discussions of the Configuring Light expert working group. Consisting of high-profile experts and stakeholders in the fields of design, planning and policy-making, this group was established by CL to develop a new agenda for tackling social inequalities in public lighting. Members of the working group are listed at the end of this document.This project was run by the LSE-based Configuring Light/Staging the Social research programme and funded by LSE Knowledge Exchange and Impact funding.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author London School of Economics Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2528  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Walch, O.J.; Cochran, A.; Forger, D.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A global quantification of “normal” sleep schedules using smartphone data Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal Science Advances  
  Volume 2 Issue 5 Pages e1501705-e1501705  
  Keywords Human Health; Sleep; *Circadian Rhythm; smartphone; society  
  Abstract The influence of the circadian clock on sleep scheduling has been studied extensively in the laboratory; however, the effects of society on sleep remain largely unquantified. We show how a smartphone app that we have developed, ENTRAIN, accurately collects data on sleep habits around the world. Through mathematical modeling and statistics, we find that social pressures weaken and/or conceal biological drives in the evening, leading individuals to delay their bedtime and shorten their sleep. A country’s average bedtime, but not average wake time, predicts sleep duration. We further show that mathematical models based on controlled laboratory experiments predict qualitative trends in sunrise, sunset, and light level; however, these effects are attenuated in the real world around bedtime. Additionally, we find that women schedule more sleep than men and that users reporting that they are typically exposed to outdoor light go to sleep earlier and sleep more than those reporting indoor light. Finally, we find that age is the primary determinant of sleep timing, and that age plays an important role in the variability of population-level sleep habits. This work better defines and personalizes “normal” sleep, produces hypotheses for future testing in the laboratory, and suggests important ways to counteract the global sleep crisis.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1440  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Falchi, F.; Cinzano, P.; Duriscoe, D.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Elvidge, C.D.; Baugh, K.; Portnov, B.A.; Rybnikova, N.A.; Furgoni, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal Science Advances  
  Volume 2 Issue 6 Pages e1600377-e1600377  
  Keywords Skyglow; Conservation; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Artificial lights raise night sky luminance, creating the most visible effect of light pollution—artificial skyglow. Despite the increasing interest among scientists in fields such as ecology, astronomy, health care, and land-use planning, light pollution lacks a current quantification of its magnitude on a global scale. To overcome this, we present the world atlas of artificial sky luminance, computed with our light pollution propagation software using new high-resolution satellite data and new precision sky brightness measurements. This atlas shows that more than 80% of the world and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies. The Milky Way is hidden from more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans. Moreover, 23% of the world’s land surfaces between 75°N and 60°S, 88% of Europe, and almost half of the United States experience light-polluted nights.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1466  
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