|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Xiaolong, G.; Mo, Z.; Xian, L.; Ce, S.; Changbin, S.; Ying, L.
Title Effects of LED light quality on the growth, metabolism, and energy budgets of Haliotis discus discus Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture
Volume (down) 453 Issue Pages 31-39
Keywords Animals; Abalone; LED; Metabolism; Energy budgets; Haliotis discus; Haliotis discus discus; Photobiology
Abstract In this study, a bioenergetics approach was used to examine the effects of different LED light qualities (red, orange, blue, green light, natural light and a dark setting) on the growth and survival of the abalone Haliotis discus discus, and its physiological response mechanism under different light qualities. The results suggest that under blue or green light, the survival rate, specific growth rate, food intake, and food conversion efficiency of H. d. discus were significantly lower than in those groups under red or orange light (P < 0.05). Under red or orange light, pepsin, amylase and cellulose activity was significantly higher than those in any other light quality group (P < 0.05), whereas lipase activity exhibited no significant difference among the light quality groups (P > 0.05). Under blue or green light, lactate dehydrogenase activity and lactic acid content were higher (P < 0.05), suggesting enhanced anaerobic metabolism. Under blue or green light, H. d. discus lost more energy via excretion, feces and respiration than was acquired from its food. Under red or orange light, H. d. discus acquired more energy from its food and lost less energy via excretion and feces; as a result, its assimilation efficiency (K1) and net growth efficiency (K2) were significantly higher than those of any other group (P < 0.05). Therefore, we suggest that red or orange light should be used as a light source for the aquaculture of H. d. discus.
Address Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1311
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jean, N.; Burke, M.; Xie, M.; Davis, W.M.; Lobell, D.B.; Ermon, S.
Title Combining satellite imagery and machine learning to predict poverty Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume (down) 353 Issue 6301 Pages 790-794
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Nighttime lighting is a rough proxy for economic wealth, and nighttime maps of the world show that many developing countries are sparsely illuminated. Jean et al. combined nighttime maps with high-resolution daytime satellite images (see the Perspective by Blumenstock). With a bit of machine-learning wizardry, the combined images can be converted into accurate estimates of household consumption and assets, both of which are hard to measure in poorer countries. Furthermore, the night- and day-time data are publicly available and nonproprietary.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1507
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kintisch, E.
Title Voyage into darkness Type
Year 2016 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume (down) 351 Issue 6279 Pages 1254-1257
Keywords Commentary
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26989231 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1401
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Traill, L.W.; Martin, J.; Owen-Smith, N.
Title Lion proximity, not moon phase, affects the nocturnal movement behaviour of zebra and wildebeest Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal J Zool
Volume (down) 299 Issue 3 Pages 221-227
Keywords Animals; Moonlight
Abstract Moon phase affects nocturnal activity patterns in mammals. Among ungulates, a number of studies have found animals to be more active over full moon nights. This may be because increased luminosity provides increased opportunity to forage and/or increased ability to detect predators; known as the visual acuity hypothesis. Here, we use GPS-derived movement data to test for the influence of moon phase on plains zebra Equus quagga and blue wildebeest Connochaetes taurinus activity in Kruger National Park, South Africa. We compare animal movement (rate and displacement) over full and new moon nights, and consider the effect of lion proximity. We found that lion proximity largely determined the nocturnal movements of zebra and wildebeest, not moon phase. When lions were >1 km away, there was no difference in the nocturnal movement activity of prey animals over full and new moon conditions, contradicting previous findings. When lions were within 1 km of these animals, however, the movement of zebra and wildebeest greatly increased over the new moon, the relatively dark period when lion were most likely hunting. Although we could not explicitly test for predator detection here, our findings suggest that the visual acuity hypothesis does not hold for zebra and wildebeest in Kruger National Park (KNP) given that there is no evidence for increased foraging activity over the full moon. The influence of moon phase on the nocturnal activity of African ungulates may be more complicated than anticipated, and we suggest that this cannot be estimated unless predator proximity is accounted for.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0952-8369 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1558
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author ffrench-Constant, R.; Somers-Yeates, R.; Bennie, J.; Economou, T.; Hodgson, D.; Spalding, A.; McGregor, P.
Title Light pollution is associated with earlier tree budburst across the United Kingdom Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Roy Soc B Biol Sci
Volume (down) 283 Issue 1833 Pages 1-9
Keywords Plants; light pollution, phenology, species interactions, tree budburst, temperature, urban heat islands; United Kingdom
Abstract The ecological impact of night-time lighting is of concern because of its well-demonstrated effects on animal behaviour. However, the potential of light pollution to change plant phenology and its corresponding knock-on effects on associated herbivores are less clear. Here, we test if artificial lighting can advance the timing of budburst in trees. We took a UK-wide 13 year dataset of spatially referenced budburst data from four deciduous tree species and matched it with both satellite imagery of night-time lighting and average spring temperature. We find that budburst occurs up to 7.5 days earlier in brighter areas, with the relationship being more pronounced for later-budding species. Excluding large urban areas from the analysis showed an even more pronounced advance of budburst, confirming that the urban ‘heat-island’ effect is not the sole cause of earlier urban budburst. Similarly, the advance in budburst across all sites is too large to be explained by increases in temperature alone. This dramatic advance of budburst illustrates the need for further experimental investigation into the impact of artificial night-time lighting on plant phenology and subsequent species interactions. As light pollution is a growing global phenomenon, the findings of this study are likely to be applicable to a wide range of species interactions across the world.
Address Centre for Ecology and Conservation, and 2 Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn TR10 9EZ, UK; rf222(at)exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1472
Permanent link to this record