toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Coughlin, M.; Stubbs, C.; Claver, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A daytime measurement of the lunar contribution to the night sky brightness in LSST’s ugrizy bands–initial results Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Experimental Astronomy Abbreviated Journal Exp Astron  
  Volume (down) 41 Issue 3 Pages 393-408  
  Keywords Moonlight  
  Abstract We report measurements from which we determine the spatial structure ofthe lunar contribution to night sky brightness, taken at the LSST site on Cerro Pachonin Chile. We use an array of six photodiodes with filters that approximate the LargeSynoptic Survey Telescope’su, g, r, i, z,andybands. We use the sun as a proxy forthe moon, and measure sky brightness as a function of zenith angle of the point onsky, zenith angle of the sun, and angular distance between the sun and the point onsky. We make a correction for the difference between the illumination spectrum of thesun and the moon. Since scattered sunlight totally dominates the daytime sky bright-ness, this technique allows us to cleanly determine the contribution to the (cloudless)night sky from backscattered moonlight, without contamination from other sourcesof night sky brightness. We estimate our uncertainty in the relative lunar night skybrightness vs. zenith and lunar angle to be between 0.3–0.7 mags depending on thepassband. This information is useful in planning the optimal execution of the LSSTsurvey, and perhaps for other astronomical observations as well. Although our pri-mary objective is to map out the angular structure and spectrum of the scattered lightfrom the atmosphere and particulates, we also make an estimate of the expected num-ber of scattered lunar photons per pixel per second in LSST, and find values that arein overall agreement with previous estimates.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0922-6435 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3039  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rybnikova, N.A.; Haim, A.; Portnov, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does artificial light-at-night exposure contribute to the worldwide obesity pandemic? Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication International Journal of Obesity (2005) Abbreviated Journal Int J Obes (Lond)  
  Volume (down) 40 Issue 5 Pages 815-824  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Worldwide overweight and obesity rates are on the rise, with about 1 900 billion adults being defined as overweight and about 600 million adults being defined as obese by the World Health Organization (WHO). Increasing exposure to artificial light-at-night (ALAN) may influence body mass, by suppression of melatonin production and disruption of daily rhythms, resulting in physiological or behavioral changes in the human body, and may thus become a driving force behind worldwide overweight and obesity pandemic. METHODS: We analyzed most recent satellite images of night time illumination, available from the US Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), combining them with country-level data on female and male overweight and obesity prevalence rates, reported by the WHO. The study aims to identify and measure the strength of association between ALAN and country-wide overweight and obesity rates, controlling for per capita GDP, level of urbanization, birth rate, food consumption and regional differences. RESULTS: ALAN emerged as a statistically significant and positive predictor of overweight and obesity (t>1.97; P<0.05), helping to explain, together with other factors, about 70% of the observed variation of overweight and obesity prevalence rates among females and males in more than 80 countries worldwide. Regional differences in the strength of association between ALAN and excessive body mass are also noted. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first population-level study that confirms the results of laboratory research and cohort studies in which ALAN was found to be a contributing factor to excessive body mass in humans.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 23 February 2016; doi:10.1038/ijo.2015.255.  
  Address Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Faculty of Management, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0307-0565 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26795746 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1381  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ohayon, M.M.; Milesi, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Outdoor Nighttime Lights Associate with Altered Sleep Behavior in the American General Population Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep  
  Volume (down) 39 Issue 6 Pages 1311-1320  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing; Sleep  
  Abstract STUDY OBJECTIVES: Our study aims to explore the associations between outdoor nighttime lights (ONL) and sleep patterns in the human population. METHODS: Cross-sectional telephone study of a representative sample of the general US population age 18 y or older. 19,136 noninstitutionalized individuals (participation rate: 83.2%) were interviewed by telephone. The Sleep-EVAL expert system administered questions on life and sleeping habits; health; sleep, mental and organic disorders (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision; International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Second Edition; International Classification of Diseases, 10(th) Edition). Individuals were geolocated by longitude and latitude. Outdoor nighttime light measurements were obtained from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS), with nighttime passes taking place between 19:30 and 22:30 local time. Light data were correlated precisely to the geolocation of each participant of the general population sample. RESULTS: Living in areas with greater ONL was associated with delayed bedtime (P < 0.0001) and wake up time (P < 0.0001), shorter sleep duration (P < 0.01), and increased daytime sleepiness (P < 0.0001). Living in areas with greater ONL also increased the dissatisfaction with sleep quantity and quality (P < 0.0001) and the likelihood of having a diagnostic profile congruent with a circadian rhythm disorder (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Although they improve the overall safety of people and traffic, nighttime lights in our streets and cities are clearly linked with modifications in human sleep behaviors and also impinge on the daytime functioning of individuals living in areas with greater ONL.  
  Address NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27091523; PMCID:PMC4863221 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2551  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rybnikova, N.A.; Portnov, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor light and breast cancer incidence: a comparative analysis of DMSP and VIIRS-DNB satellite data Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing  
  Volume (down) 38 Issue 21 Pages 5952-5961  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Several population-level studies explored the association between breast cancer (BC) incidence and artificial light-at-night (ALAN), and found higher BC rates in more lit areas. Most of these studies used ALAN satellite data, available from the United States Defence Meteorological Satellite Program (US-DMSP), while, in recent years, higher-resolution ALAN data sources, such as Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Day-Night Band (VIIRS-DNB), have become available. The present study aims to determine whether the use of different ALAN data sources may affect the BC–ALAN association. As the test case, we use data on BC incidence rates in women residing in the Greater Haifa Metropolitan Area (GHMA; Israel), matching them with US-DMSP and VIIRS-DNB data on ALAN intensities, and controlling for several potential confounders, including age, fertility, and socio-economic status (SES). Both ordinary least squares (OLS) and spatial dependency models were used in the analysis. ALAN emerged as a stronger predictor of BC rates in models based on better-resolution VIIRS-DNB estimates (t > 6.035; p < 0.01) than in models based on coarser US-DMSP data (t < 4.196; p < 0.01).  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1552  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Voigt, L.P.; Reynolds, K.; Mehryar, M.; Chan, W.S.; Kostelecky, N.; Pastores, S.M.; Halpern, N.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Monitoring sound and light continuously in an intensive care unit patient room: A pilot study Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Critical Care Abbreviated Journal Journal of Critical Care  
  Volume (down) 38 Issue 21 Pages 5952-5961  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Human Health  
  Abstract Purpose

To determine the feasibility of continuous recording of sound and light in the intensive care unit (ICU).

Materials and Methods

Four one-hour baseline scenarios in an empty ICU patient room by day and night (doors open or closed and maximal or minimal lighting) and two daytime scenarios simulating a stable and unstable patient (quiet or loud devices and staff) were conducted. Sound and light levels were continuously recorded using a commercially available multisensor monitor and transmitted via the hospital's network to a cloud-based data storage and management system.

Results

The empty ICU room was loud with similar mean sound levels for the day and night simulations of 45–46 dBA. Mean levels for maximal lighting during day and night ranged from 1306–1812 lux and mean levels for minimum lighting were 1–3 lux. The mean sound levels for the stable and unstable patient simulations were 61 and 81 dBA, respectively. The mean light levels were 349 lux for the stable patient and 1947 lux for the unstable patient.

Conclusions

Combined sound and light can be continuously and easily monitored in the ICU setting. Incorporating sound and light monitors in ICU rooms may promote an enhanced patient and staff centered healing environment.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0883-9441 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1614  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: