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Author Rodríguez Martín, A.; Chiaradia, A.; Wasiak, P.; Renwick, L.; Dann, P.
Title Waddling on the Dark Side: Ambient Light Affects Attendance Behavior of Little Penguins Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume (down) 0748730415626010 Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; birds; penguins; attendance; little penguin; Eudyptula minor; Phillip Island; Australia; photobiology; seabirds
Abstract Visible light on Earth largely comes from the sun, including light reflected from the moon. Predation risk is strongly determined by light conditions, and some animals are nocturnal to reduce predation. Artificial lights and its consequent light pollution may disrupt this natural behavior. Here, we used 13 years of attendance data to study the effects of sun, moon, and artificial light on the attendance pattern of a nocturnal seabird, the little penguin Eudyptula minor at Phillip Island, Australia. The little penguin is the smallest and the only penguin species whose activity on land is strictly nocturnal. Automated monitoring systems recorded individually marked penguins every time they arrived (after sunset) at or departed (before sunrise) from 2 colonies under different lighting conditions: natural night skylight and artificial lights (around 3 lux) used to enhance penguin viewing for ecotourism around sunset. Sunlight had a strong effect on attendance as penguins arrived on average around 81 min after sunset and departed around 92 min before sunrise. The effect of moonlight was also strong, varying according to moon phase. Fewer penguins came ashore during full moon nights. Moon phase effect was stronger on departure than arrival times. Thus, during nights between full moon and last quarter, arrival times (after sunset) were delayed, even though moonlight levels were low, while departure times (before sunrise) were earlier, coinciding with high moonlight levels. Cyclic patterns of moon effect were slightly out of phase but significantly between 2 colonies, which could be due to site-specific differences or presence/absence of artificial lights. Moonlight could be overridden by artificial light at our artificially lit colony, but the similar amplitude of attendance patterns between colonies suggests that artificial light did not mask the moonlight effect. Further research is indeed necessary to understand how seabirds respond to the increasing artificial night light levels.
Address Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Estación Biológica de Doñana, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Avda. Américo Vespucio s/n, 41092 Seville, Spain; airamrguez(at)ebd.csic.es
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1345
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Author Lucas, M.A.; Chahl, J.S.
Title Challenges for biomimetic night time sky polarization navigation Type Conference Article
Year 2016 Publication Proceedings of the SPIE Abbreviated Journal Proc SPIE
Volume (down) 9797 Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; detection of light; biology; polarization; navigation
Abstract Studies on some species of insects have shown them to use the polarization pattern cast by the moon in the night sky to control heading. Additional heading cues are of value to autonomous systems, since the earth’s magnetic field is not uniform, often not available and is substantially modified by local phenomena. In addition to the required low-light sensitivity of a night time polarization compass, additional complexities caused by the relative intensity of terrestrial sources must be overcome. We will show that the end result will tend to be a less reliable compass than the equivalent day time polarization device.
Address Univ. of South Australia, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1430
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Author Bullough, J.D.; Skinner, N.P.; Plummer, T.T.
Title Assessment of an Adaptive Driving Beam Headlighting System: Visibility and Glare Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Abbreviated Journal Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board
Volume (down) 2555 Issue Pages 81-85
Keywords Lighting
Abstract Recent developments in solid-state lighting, sensor, and control technologies make new configurations for vehicle forward lighting feasible. Adaptive driving beam (ADB) systems build on systems that automatically switch from high- to low-beam headlights in the presence of oncoming vehicles. ADB systems can detect oncoming headlights and preceding taillights and reduce their intensity only in the direction of the other lights, while they maintain higher levels of illumination throughout the remainder of the field of view. The nominal benefit of ADB systems is the provision of high-beam levels of illumination in the forward scene, while glare is reduced to oncoming and preceding drivers, who perceive low-beam illumination levels. In this study, two dynamic field experiments were conducted: one experiment measured the ability of observers to identify the walking direction of roadside pedestrian targets with and without the use of the ADB system; the other experiment evaluated the discomfort glare elicited by the ADB system compared with the glare from conventional low- and high-beam headlights. The findings from both experiments were consistent with previous analytical and static field tests and suggested that ADB systems can offer safety benefits beyond those offered by conventional headlight systems.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0361-1981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1618
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Author Voiculescu, S.E.; Duc, D.L.; Rosca, A.E.; Zeca, V.; Chitimus, D.M.; Arsene, A.L.; Dragoi, C.M.; Nicolae, A.C.; Zagrean, L.; Schöneberg, T.; Zagrean, A.-M.
Title Behavioral and molecular effects of prenatal continuous light exposure in the adult rat Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Brain Research
Volume (down) 1650 Issue Pages 51–59
Keywords Animals
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-8993 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1509
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Author Bolton, D.; Mayer-Pinto, M.; Clark, G.F.; Dafforn, K.A.; Brassil, W.A.; Becker, A.; Johnston, E.L.
Title Coastal urban lighting has ecological consequences for multiple trophic levels under the sea Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume (down) 576 Issue Pages 1-9
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract Urban land and seascapes are increasingly exposed to artificial lighting at night (ALAN), which is a significant source of light pollution. A broad range of ecological effects are associated with ALAN, but the changes to ecological processes remain largely unstudied. Predation is a key ecological process that structures assemblages and responds to natural cycles of light and dark. We investigated the effect of ALAN on fish predatory behaviour, and sessile invertebrate prey assemblages. Over 21days fish and sessile assemblages were exposed to 3 light treatments (Day, Night and ALAN). An array of LED spotlights was installed under a wharf to create the ALAN treatments. We used GoPro cameras to film during the day and ALAN treatments, and a Dual frequency IDentification SONar (DIDSON) to film during the night treatments. Fish were most abundant during unlit nights, but were also relatively sedentary. Predatory behaviour was greatest during the day and under ALAN than at night, suggesting that fish are using structures for non-feeding purposes (e.g. shelter) at night, but artificial light dramatically increases their predatory behaviour. Altered predator behaviour corresponded with structural changes to sessile prey assemblages among the experimental lighting treatments. We demonstrate the direct effects of artificial lighting on fish behaviour and the concomitant indirect effects on sessile assemblage structure. Current and future projected use of artificial lights has the potential to significantly affect predator-prey interactions in marine systems by altering habitat use for both predators and prey. However, developments in lighting technology are a promising avenue for mitigation. This is among the first empirical evidence from the marine system on how ALAN can directly alter predation, a fundamental ecosystem process, and have indirect trophic consequences.
Address Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Sydney Institute of Marine Sciences, Mosman, NSW 2088, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27780095 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1548
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