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Author Choo, G.-H.; Jeong, M.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Estimation of nighttime aerosol optical thickness from Suomi-NPP DNB observations over small cities in Korea Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Korean Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Korean Journal of Remote Sensing  
  Volume (down) 32 Issue 2 Pages 73-86  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In this study, an algorithm to estimate Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) over small cities during nighttime has been developed by using the radiance from artificial light sources in small cities measured from Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor's Day/Night Band (DNB) aboard the Suomi-National Polar Partnership (Suomi-NPP) satellite. The algorithm is based on Beer's extinction law with the light sources from the artificial lights over small cities. AOT is retrieved for cloud-free pixels over individual cities, and cloud-screening was conducted by using the measurements from M-bands of VIIRS at infrared wavelengths. The retrieved nighttime AOT is compared with the aerosol products from MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Terra and Aqua satellites. As a result, the correlation coefficients over individual cities range from around 0.6 and 0.7 between the retrieved nighttime AOT and MODIS AOT with Root-Mean-Squared Difference (RMSD) ranged from 0.14 to 0.18. In addition, sensitivity tests were conducted for the factors affecting the nighttime AOT to estimate the range of uncertainty in the nighttime AOT retrievals. The results of this study indicate that it is promising to infer AOT using the DNB measaurements over small cities in Korea at night. After further development and refinement in the future, the developed retrieval algorithm is expected to produce nighttime aerosol information which is not operationally available over Korea.  
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  ISSN 1225-6161 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1524  
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Author Joo, E.Y.; Abbott, S.M.; Reid, K.J.; Wu, D.; Kang, J.; Wilson, J.; Zee, P.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Timing of light exposure and activity in adults with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med  
  Volume (down) 32 Issue Pages 259-265  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To characterize the patterns of light exposure and physical activity level and assess their relationship with sleep quality and depressive symptoms in adults with delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD). METHODS: 42 DSWPD (22 female, mean age 34.5 y) and 26 (+/-4 years) age-and-sex-matched controls (12 female, mean age 33.4 y) underwent seven days of light and activity monitoring. RESULTS: Individuals with DSWPD had significantly delayed bed times and wake times, but similar sleep duration compared to controls. Subjective sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI)) was poorer in DSWPDs compared to controls. Those with DSWPD had significantly more activity and light exposure late at night (2:00-4:00) and significantly less activity and light exposure in the morning (8:00-11:00). Total 24 h levels of light and activity were not significantly different between DSWPD and controls. However, the DSWPD group had significantly more light exposure than controls 22 h after waking, during their sleep period. Later light exposure correlated with higher depression scores [Beck Depression Index (BDI)] and poorer sleep quality (PSQI). CONCLUSIONS: The light exposure patterns observed in DSWPD likely contribute to and perpetuate the chronically delayed sleep and wake phase in these patients. In addition, increased light exposure during the sleep period may also contribute to the poor sleep quality and mood disorders that are common in these individuals.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address: p-zee@northwestern.edu  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27964860 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1639  
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Author Warrant, E.; Dacke, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Visual Navigation in Nocturnal Insects Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Physiology (Bethesda, Md.) Abbreviated Journal Physiology (Bethesda)  
  Volume (down) 31 Issue 3 Pages 182-192  
  Keywords Vision; Animals  
  Abstract Despite their tiny eyes and brains, nocturnal insects have evolved a remarkable capacity to visually navigate at night. Whereas some use moonlight or the stars as celestial compass cues to maintain a straight-line course, others use visual landmarks to navigate to and from their nest. These impressive abilities rely on highly sensitive compound eyes and specialized visual processing strategies in the brain.  
  Address Department of Biology, Lund Vision Group, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1548-9221 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27053732 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1417  
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Author Buijs, F.N.; Leon-Mercado, L.; Guzman-Ruiz, M.; Guerrero-Vargas, N.N.; Romo-Nava, F.; Buijs, R.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Circadian System: A Regulatory Feedback Network of Periphery and Brain Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Physiology (Bethesda, Md.) Abbreviated Journal Physiology (Bethesda)  
  Volume (down) 31 Issue 3 Pages 170-181  
  Keywords Human health; circadian rhythm; suprachiasmatic nucleus; brain; clock genes; SCN; review; circadian desynchronization; shiftwork  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms are generated by the autonomous circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and clock genes that are present in all tissues. The SCN times these peripheral clocks, as well as behavioral and physiological processes. Recent studies show that frequent violations of conditions set by our biological clock, such as shift work, jet lag, sleep deprivation, or simply eating at the wrong time of the day, may have deleterious effects on health. This infringement, also known as circadian desynchronization, is associated with chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, cancer, and psychiatric disorders. In this review, we will evaluate evidence that these diseases stem from the need of the SCN for peripheral feedback to fine-tune its output and adjust physiological processes to the requirements of the moment. This feedback can vary from neuronal or hormonal signals from the liver to changes in blood pressure. Desynchronization renders the circadian network dysfunctional, resulting in a breakdown of many functions driven by the SCN, disrupting core clock rhythms in the periphery and disorganizing cellular processes that are normally driven by the synchrony between behavior and peripheral signals with neuronal and humoral output of the hypothalamus. Consequently, we propose that the loss of synchrony between the different elements of this circadian network as may occur during shiftwork and jet lag is the reason for the occurrence of health problems.  
  Address Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico; ruudbuijs(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher American Physiological Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1548-9221 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27053731 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1429  
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Author Aulsebrook, A.E.; Jones, T.M.; Rattenborg, N.C.; Roth, T.C. 2nd; Lesku, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep Ecophysiology: Integrating Neuroscience and Ecology Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Trends in Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal Trends Ecol Evol  
  Volume (down) 31 Issue 8 Pages 590-599  
  Keywords Commentary; Physiology  
  Abstract Here, we propose an original approach to explain one of the great unresolved questions in animal biology: what is the function of sleep? Existing ecological and neurological approaches to this question have become roadblocks to an answer. Ecologists typically treat sleep as a simple behavior, instead of a heterogeneous neurophysiological state, while neuroscientists generally fail to appreciate the critical insights offered by the consideration of ecology and evolutionary history. Redressing these shortfalls requires cross-disciplinary integration. By bringing together aspects of behavioral ecology, evolution, and conservation with neurophysiology, we can achieve a more comprehensive understanding of sleep, including its implications for adaptive waking behavior and fitness.  
  Address La Trobe University, School of Life Sciences, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: j.lesku@latrobe.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27262386 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1462  
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