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Author Kocifaj, M.; Solano Lamphar, H.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Angular Emission Function of a City and Skyglow Modeling: A Critical Perspective Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal Pasp  
  Volume (down) 128 Issue 970 Pages 124001  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract The radiative transfer equation (RTE) is a common approach to solving the transfer of electromagnetic energy in heterogeneous disperse media, such as atmospheric environment. One-dimensional RTE is a linear boundary value problem that is well suited to plane-parallel atmosphere with no diffuse intensity entering the top of the atmosphere. In nighttime regime, the ground-based light sources illuminate the atmosphere at its bottom interface. However, the light-pollution models conventionally use radiant intensity function rather than radiance. This might potentially result in a number of misconceptions. We focused on similarities and fundamental differences between both functions and clarified distinct consequences for the modeling of skyglow from finite-sized and semi-infinite light-emitting flat surfaces. Minimum requirements to be fulfilled by a City Emission Function (CEF) are formulated to ensure a successful solution of standard and inverse problems. It has been shown that the horizon radiance of a flat surface emitting in accordance with Garstang's function (GEF) would exceed any limit, meaning that the GEF is not an appropriate tool to model skyglow from distant sources. We developed two alternative CEFs to remedy this problem through correction of direct upward emissions; the most important strengths of the modified CEFs are detailed in this paper. Numerical experiments on sky luminance under well-posed and ill-posed boundary conditions were made for two extreme uplight fractions (F) and for three discrete distances from the city edge. The errors induced by replacing radiance with radiant intensity function in the RTE are generally low (15%–30%) if F is as large as 0.15, but alteration of the luminance may range over 1–3 orders of magnitude if F approaches zero. In the latter case, the error margin can increase by a factor of 10–100 or even 1000, even if the angular structure of luminance patterns suffers only weak changes. This is why such a shift in luminance magnitudes can be mistakenly interpreted as the effect of inaccurate estimate of lumens per head of the population rather than the effect of cosine distortion due to ill-posed inputs to the RTE. For that reason, a thorough revision (and/or remediation) of theoretical and computational models is suggested.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1564  
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Author Justice, M.J.; Justice, T.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Attraction of Insects to Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent, Halogen, and Led Lamps in a Light Trap: Implications for Light Pollution and Urban Ecologies Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Entomological News Abbreviated Journal Entomological News  
  Volume (down) 125 Issue 5 Pages 315-326  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract The widespread use of electric lamps has created “ecological light pollution” and “artificial light ecology.” Given the important role of insects in ecosystems, how they are affected by light pollution deserves attention. Lamps designed for lighting small areas around residences are used in abundance, but studies specifically examining them are scarce. This study used a light trap to capture insects for 60 summer nights in a suburban town in Virginia, USA. During each night of trapping, one of five different light bulbs was used in the trap (incandescent, compact fluorescent, halogen, warm color temperature LED, or cool color temperature LED). The data suggest that fewer insects overall are attracted to bulbs using LED technology than bulbs using incandescent technology. This difference was also observed in the orders Lepidoptera and Diptera. These results support the use of LED bulbs to reduce the insect attraction and mortality caused by the use of artificial lights at night.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-872X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1419  
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Author Watson, M.J.; Wilson, D.R.; Mennill, D.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Anthropogenic light is associated with increased vocal activity by nocturnally migrating birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Condor Abbreviated Journal The Condor  
  Volume (down) 118 Issue 2 Pages 338-344  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Anthropogenic modifications to the natural environment have profound effects on wild animals, through structural changes to natural ecosystems as well as anthropogenic disturbances such as light and noise. For animals that migrate nocturnally, anthropogenic light can interfere with migration routes, flight altitudes, and social activities that accompany migration, such as acoustic communication. We investigated the effect of anthropogenic light on nocturnal migration of birds through the Great Lakes ecosystem. Specifically, we recorded the vocal activity of migrating birds and compared the number of nocturnal flight calls produced above rural areas with ground-level artificial lights compared to nearby areas without lights. We show that more nocturnal flight calls are detected over artificially lit areas. The median number of nocturnal flight calls recorded at sites with artificial lights (31 per night, interquartile range: 15–135) was 3 times higher than at nearby sites without artificial lights (11 per night, interquartile range: 4–39). By contrast, the number of species detected at lit and unlit sites did not differ significantly (artificially lit sites: 6.5 per night, interquartile range: 5.0–8.8; unlit sites: 4.5 per night, interquartile range: 2.0–7.0). We conclude that artificial lighting changes the behavior of nocturnally migrating birds. The increased detections could be a result of ground-level light sources altering bird behavior during migration. For example, birds might have changed their migratory route to pass over lit areas, flown at lower altitudes over lit areas, increased their calling rate over lit areas, or remained longer over lit areas. Our results for ground-level lights correspond to previous findings demonstrating that migratory birds are influenced by lights on tall structures.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0010-5422 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1422  
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Author Da Silva, A.; Valcu, M.; Kempenaers, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Behavioural plasticity in the onset of dawn song under intermittent experimental night lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal Animal Behaviour  
  Volume (down) 117 Issue Pages 155-165  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The disruption of daily rhythms is one of the most studied ecological consequences of light pollution. Previous work showed that several songbird species initiated dawn song earlier in areas with light pollution. However, the mechanisms underlying this shift are still unknown. Individuals may immediately adjust their timing of singing to the presence of artificial light (behavioural plasticity), but the observed effect may also be due to phenotype-dependent habitat choice, effects of conditions during early life or micro-evolution. The main aim of this study was to experimentally investigate how males of four common passerine species respond to day-to-day variation in the presence of artificial night lighting in terms of the timing of singing. During two consecutive breeding seasons, we manipulated the presence of light throughout the night in a cyclic fashion in several naturally undisturbed forest patches. We show that individuals of all four species immediately and reversibly adjusted their onset of dawn singing in response to artificial light. The effect was strongest in the European robin, but relatively small in the blue tit, the great tit and the blackbird. The effect in the latter two species was smaller than expected from the correlational studies. This may be coincidence (small sample size of this study), but it could also indicate that there are longer-term effects of living in light-polluted urban areas on timing of dawn singing, or that birds use compensatory behaviours such as light avoidance. We found no evidence that our light treatment had carryover effects into the subsequent dark period, but robins progressively advanced their dawn singing during the light treatment.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-3472 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1467  
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Author Rossi, F.; Bonamente, E.; Nicolini, A.; Anderini, E.; Cotana, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A carbon footprint and energy consumption assessment methodology for UHI-affected lighting systems in built areas Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Energy and Buildings Abbreviated Journal Energy and Buildings  
  Volume (down) 114 Issue Pages 96-103  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Energy  
  Abstract This paper investigates the effects of urban heat island (UHI) on outdoor lighting systems in terms of GHG emissions: a novel methodology is proposed to assess the carbon footprint (CF) change of lighting services in built areas caused by UHI-induced ΔT with particular focus on the evaluation of the energy consumption. The methodology can be applied also to other activities affected by the UHI, such as HVAC and transport systems. In particular, ΔCF was introduced by a two-fold approach: the quantification of the CF change due to UHI (as difference between CF in an UHI-affected case and CF for an UHI-less case) and the CF change produced by a 1 °C temperature change. A focus on LED lamps was developed: the lifetime of LEDs exponentially decreases with increasing temperature and the luminous flux exponentially decays with operation time. UHI (i.e. the increase in ambient temperature) affects the lifetime and the luminous flux of lamps producing higher energy consumption and higher replacement rates. Results showed that a positive ΔT due to UHI produces a positive ΔCF, which also becomes economically relevant in long-term scenarios. A case study was analyzed by applying the proposed methodology to Rome outdoor public lighting.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0378-7788 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2483  
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