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Author Plummer, K.E.; Hale, J.D.; O'Callaghan, M.J.; Sadler, J.P.; Siriwardena, G.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Investigating the impact of street lighting changes on garden moth communities Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Urban Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Urban Ecol  
  Volume (up) 2 Issue 1 Pages juw004  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Night time illumination of cities is undergoing radical change through the adoption of new street lighting technologies, but the impacts of these large-scale changes on biodiversity have not been explored. Moths are of particular concern because of their nocturnal ‘flight-to-light’ responses. Here we examine in situ effects of (1) street lamp replacement and (2) the spatial distribution of local street lighting on garden moth communities in Birmingham, UK, to determine whether current shifts in street lighting infrastructure are leading to an increased attraction of moths into suburban areas. Using a unique before-after-control-impact survey, we show that switching from narrow (low-pressure sodium) to broad spectrum (high-pressure sodium) lamps significantly increases the diversity of macro-moths in suburban gardens. Furthermore, we demonstrate the complex ways in which the moth community differentially responds to variation in street lighting characteristics. In particular we found that macro-moth attraction was greatest at high lamp densities, whilst micro-moth families responded more strongly to street lamp proximity and the density of UV-emitting lamps specifically. Our findings indicate that moths are attracted to suburban gardens with closer, more dense and more spectrally diverse local street lighting, and suggest that suburban areas could represent ecological traps for moth communities if they have insufficient resources to support moth survival and reproduction. Further research is now needed to determine whether street lighting is progressively damaging moth communities, and to understand whether these impacts could be mitigated through changes to street lighting regimes or through the provision of ecologically important habitats in urban landscapes.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2058-5543 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1500  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Daoud-Opit, S.; Jones, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Guided by the light: Roost choice and behaviour of urban Rainbow Lorikeets (Trichoglossus haematodus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication European Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (up) 2 Issue 1 Pages 72-80  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract 1. The formation of large communal roosts is a conspicuous phenomenon associated with a wide range of bird species successfully exploiting urban environments. In many Australian cities, the abundance of the Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), a native parrot, has increased markedly in recent decades, with the species roosting in very large numbers within suburban sites. These roosting locations are noisy and cause significant fouling of the land beneath, resulting in conflict with humans.

2. We investigated the selection of roosting sites in this species in Brisbane, Australia, by comparing characteristics of both the general sites of these roosts as well as individual trees used within roosting sites and trees that were avoided.

3. Lorikeets used a wide variety of tree types for roosting but demonstrated a clear preference for clumped trees within sparsely treed areas that received significantly more artificial light at night than otherwise suitable sites and trees nearby.

4. These features of roosting sites may enhance the detection of nocturnal predators by Rainbow Lorikeets, suggesting a potential positive impact of anthropogenic lighting. Our findings provide valuable insights into the management of roost-related conflicts in urban areas. We encourage further investigations into the possible benefits of artificial light.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1339-8474 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1641  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thums, M.; Whiting, S.D.; Reisser, J.; Pendoley, K.L.; Pattiaratchi, C.B.; Proietti, M.; Hetzel, Y.; Fisher, R.; Meekan, M.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light on water attracts turtle hatchlings during their near shore transit Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal R. Soc. open sci.  
  Volume (up) 3 Issue 5 Pages 160142  
  Keywords Animals; acoustic telemetry; in-water movement; VR2W positioning system; green turtle; light pollution; coastal development; Chelonia mydas; ecology; sea turtle  
  Abstract We examined the effect of artificial light on the near shore trajectories of turtle hatchlings dispersing from natal beaches. Green turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchlings were tagged with miniature acoustic transmitters and their movements tracked within an underwater array of 36 acoustic receivers placed in the near shore zone. A total of 40 hatchlings were tracked, 20 of which were subjected to artificial light during their transit of the array. At the same time, we measured current speed and direction, which were highly variable within and between experimental nights and treatments. Artificial lighting affected hatchling behaviour, with 88% of individual trajectories oriented towards the light and spending, on average, 23% more time in the 2.25 ha tracking array (19.5 ± 5 min) than under ambient light conditions (15.8 ± 5 min). Current speed had little to no effect on the bearing (angular direction) of the hatchling tracks when artificial light was present, but under ambient conditions it influenced the bearing of the tracks when current direction was offshore and above speeds of approximately 32.5 cm s−1. This is the first experimental evidence that wild turtle hatchlings are attracted to artificial light after entering the ocean, a behaviour that is likely to subject them to greater risk of predation. The experimental protocol described in this study can be used to assess the effect of anthropogenic (light pollution, noise, etc.) and natural (wave action, current, wind, moonlight) influences on the in-water movements of sea turtle hatchlings during the early phase of dispersal.  
  Address Australian Institute of Marine Science c/o The UWA Oceans Institute (MO96), University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2054-5703 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1454  
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Author Dorado-Correa, A.M.; Rodríguez-Rocha, M.; Brumm, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Anthropogenic noise, but not artificial light levels predicts song behaviour in an equatorial bird Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal R. Soc. open sci.  
  Volume (up) 3 Issue 7 Pages 160231  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Birds in cities start singing earlier in the morning than in rural areas; commonly this shift is attributed to light pollution. Some studies have suggested that traffic noise has a stronger influence on singing activity than artificial light does. Changes in the timing of singing behaviour in relation to noise and light pollution have only been investigated in the temperate zones. Tropical birds, however, experience little seasonal variation in day length and may be less dependent on light intensity as a modifier for reproductive behaviours such as song. To test whether noise or light pollution has a stronger impact on the dawn chorus of a tropical bird, we investigated the singing behaviour of rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis) in Bogota, Colombia at two times during the year. We found that birds in places with high noise levels started to sing earlier. Light pollution did not have a significant effect. Birds may begin to sing earlier in noisy areas to avoid acoustic masking by traffic later in the morning. Our results also suggest that some tropical birds may be less sensitive to variations in day length and thus less sensitive to light pollution.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2054-5703 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1484  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sandwell, R.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The emergence of modern lighting in Canada: A preliminary reconnaissance Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication The Extractive Industries and Society Abbreviated Journal The Extractive Industries and Society  
  Volume (up) 3 Issue 3 Pages 850-863  
  Keywords History  
  Abstract Recent work in the international field of energy history emphasizes the diversity that defines industrialization around the world, and even within different energy sectors of the same country. Energy history is a newly emerging field in Canada, and one where recent preliminary research now makes it possible to venture into the area of comparative energy studies. This paper provides a preliminary reconnaissance of the emergence of modern lighting in Canada, situating its history within the country’s larger idiosyncratic transition from the organic to the mineral energy regime. Canadians have always been among the world's highest energy consumers per capita, and they made a relatively late transition to the industrial regime. The country’s cold environment, its dispersed settlement patterns, the persistence of a distinct rural political economy supported by an abundance of energy from the organic regime, as well as the absence of cheap coal in Central Canada, help to explain the country’s distinctive characteristics. The history of lighting, however, is an exception within Canadian energy history: locally available, petroleum-based illuminating oil and stateowned hydroelectricity were adopted relatively early, comprising an exception within Canada’s late-modernizing trend: lighting, and not heat or power, led the country’s transition to the modern energy regime.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2214790X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1503  
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