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Author Bonmati-Carrion, M.A.; Hild, K.; Isherwood, C.; Sweeney, S.J.; Revell, V.L.; Skene, D.J.; Rol, M.A.; Madrid, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Relationship between Human Pupillary Light Reflex and Circadian System Status Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume (up) 11 Issue 9 Pages e0162476  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), whose photopigment melanopsin has a peak of sensitivity in the short wavelength range of the spectrum, constitute a common light input pathway to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN), the pupillary light reflex (PLR) regulatory centre, and to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the major pacemaker of the circadian system. Thus, evaluating PLR under short wavelength light (lambdamax </= 500 nm) and creating an integrated PLR parameter, as a possible tool to indirectly assess the status of the circadian system, becomes of interest. Nine monochromatic, photon-matched light stimuli (300 s), in 10 nm increments from lambdamax 420 to 500 nm were administered to 15 healthy young participants (8 females), analyzing: i) the PLR; ii) wrist temperature (WT) and motor activity rhythms (WA), iii) light exposure (L) pattern and iv) diurnal preference (Horne-Ostberg), sleep quality (Pittsburgh) and daytime sleepiness (Epworth). Linear correlations between the different PLR parameters and circadian status index obtained from WT, WA and L recordings and scores from questionnaires were calculated. In summary, we found markers of robust circadian rhythms, namely high stability, reduced fragmentation, high amplitude, phase advance and low internal desynchronization, were correlated with a reduced PLR to 460-490 nm wavelengths. Integrated circadian (CSI) and PLR (cp-PLR) parameters are proposed, that also showed an inverse correlation. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of a close relationship between the circadian system robustness and the pupillary reflex response, two non-visual functions primarily under melanopsin-ipRGC input.  
  Address Chronobiology Laboratory, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Murcia, IMIB-Arrixaca, 30100, Espinardo, Murcia, Spain  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27636197; PMCID:PMC5026360 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1537  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Correa, A.; Barba, A.; Padilla, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light Effects on Behavioural Performance Depend on the Individual State of Vigilance Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume (up) 11 Issue 11 Pages e0164945  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Research has shown that exposure to bright white light or blue-enriched light enhances alertness, but this effect is not consistently observed in tasks demanding high-level cognition (e.g., Sustained Attention to Response Task-SART, which measures inhibitory control). Individual differences in sensitivity to light effects might be mediated by variations in the basal level of arousal. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the participants' behavioural state of vigilance before light exposure, through the Psychomotor Vigilance Task. Then we compared the effects of a blue-enriched vs. dim light at nighttime on the performance of the auditory SART, by controlling for individual differences in basal arousal. The results replicated the alerting effects of blue-enriched light, as indexed by lower values of both proximal temperature and distal-proximal gradient. The main finding was that lighting effects on SART performance were highly variable across individuals and depended on their prior state of vigilance. Specifically, participants with higher levels of basal vigilance before light exposure benefited most from blue-enriched lighting, responding faster in the SART. These results highlight the importance of considering basal vigilance to define the boundary conditions of light effects on cognitive performance. Our study adds to current research delineating the complex and reciprocal interactions between lighting effects, arousal, cognitive task demands and behavioural performance.  
  Address Departamento de Psicologia Experimental. Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27820822 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1554  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author de Jong, M.; Ouyang, J.Q.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Do Wild Great Tits Avoid Exposure to Light at Night? Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume (up) 11 Issue 6 Pages e0157357  
  Keywords birds; animals; behaviour  
  Abstract Studies of wild populations have provided important insights into the effects of artificial light at night on organisms, populations and ecosystems. However, in most studies the exact amount of light at night individuals are exposed to remains unknown. Individuals can potentially control their nighttime light exposure by seeking dark spots within illuminated areas. This uncertainty makes it difficult to attribute effects to a direct effect of light at night, or to indirect effects, e.g., via an effect of light at night on food availability. In this study, we aim to quantify the nocturnal light exposure of wild birds in a previously dark forest-edge habitat, experimentally illuminated with three different colors of street lighting, in comparison to a dark control. During two consecutive breeding seasons, we deployed male great tits (Parus major) with a light logger measuring light intensity every five minutes over a 24h period. We found that three males from pairs breeding in brightly illuminated nest boxes close to green and red lamp posts, were not exposed to more artificial light at night than males from pairs breeding further away. This suggests, based on our limited sample size, that these males could have been avoiding light at night by choosing a roosting place with a reduced light intensity. Therefore, effects of light at night previously reported for this species in our experimental set-up might be indirect. In contrast to urban areas where light is omnipresent, bird species in non-urban areas may evade exposure to nocturnal artificial light, thereby avoiding direct consequences of light at night.  
  Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27355354; PMCID:PMC4927185 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1664  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yonezawa, T.; Uchida, M.; Tomioka, M.; Matsuki, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lunar Cycle Influences Spontaneous Delivery in Cows Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume (up) 11 Issue 8 Pages e0161735  
  Keywords Moonlight; Animals  
  Abstract There is a popular belief that the lunar cycle influences spontaneous delivery in both humans and cattle. To assess this relationship, we investigated the synodic distribution of spontaneous deliveries in domestic Holstein cows. We used retrospective data from 428 spontaneous, full-term deliveries within a three-year period derived from the calving records of a private farm in Hokkaido, Japan. Spontaneous birth frequency increased uniformly from the new moon to the full moon phase and decreased until the waning crescent phase. There was a statistically significant peak between the waxing gibbous and full moon phases compared with those between the last quarter and the waning crescent. These changes were clearly observed in deliveries among multiparous cows, whereas they were not evident in deliveries among nulliparous cows. These data suggest the utility of dairy cows as models for bio-meteorological studies, and indicate that monitoring lunar phases may facilitate comprehensive understanding of parturition.  
  Address Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27580019; PMCID:PMC5006988 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2082  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dominoni, D.M.; Borniger, J.C.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night, clocks and health: from humans to wild organisms Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Biology Letters Abbreviated Journal Biol Lett  
  Volume (up) 12 Issue 2 Pages 20160015  
  Keywords Commentary; Ecology  
  Abstract The increasing use of electric lights has modified the natural light environment dramatically, posing novel challenges to both humans and wildlife. Indeed, several biomedical studies have linked artificial light at night to the disruption of circadian rhythms, with important consequences for human health, such as the increasing occurrence of metabolic syndromes, cancer and reduced immunity. In wild animals, light pollution is associated with changes in circadian behaviour, reproduction and predator-prey interactions, but we know little about the underlying physiological mechanisms and whether wild species suffer the same health problems as humans. In order to fill this gap, we advocate the need for integrating ecological studies in the field, with chronobiological approaches to identify and characterize pathways that may link temporal disruption caused by light at night and potential health and fitness consequences.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26888917 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1360  
Permanent link to this record
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